419 Living Room Sofa Ottomans Design Photos And Ideas

Designed by Atelier Du Pont, this breathtaking property exists in harmony with the surrounding landscape. Oriented in a manner that creates minimal impact on the existing terrain, the house idyllically nestles into nature, with vast views of the encompassing trees and vegetation. Inside, an orange Ligne Roset Sofa provides a comfortable space for rest and relaxation. A triangular window provides a picture of the tree canopy beyond, while drawing in natural light.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
Douglas fir beams, some of which were salvaged from the original home that sat on the property, run in perpendicular lines overhead. Certain sections of the ceiling are exposed, while others are covered in drywall. For flooring, the residents, who have two young children, selected durable polished concrete. The Sven Charme sofa is by Article and the teak bureau is vintage.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
Furniture is now placed within the confines of the platform to create a defined seating area.
On a green, elevated plot in Ancram, New York, an art collector couple has designed their weekend home to serve as a gallery space for their large paintings. Designed by Swiss studio HHF Architects and Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei, the residence is an abstract work of art in itself, made up of four rectangular geometric forms clad in corrugated iron. The overlapping of the horizontal edges create dimension in the structure, while allowing vertical slivers of natural light to shine through and illuminate the interiors and artwork on the walls.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
The opposite end of the living room flows into a formal dining area. An expansive picture window and sliding doors overlook the lush city property.
One of the home's many stunning features is its cathedral-like living area with exposed redwood beams rising over 20 feet. A large red-brick fireplace enhances the room's regal aesthetic.
The carpeting was removed to reveal the concrete slab underneath, which was finished with epoxy paint. “That room just beckoned to be an entertainer’s paradise,” says Wei.
For this Eichler remodel, the objective was to respect the original bones with more thoughtful updates than what had come before. "Our goal was to design a beautiful mix of finishes that respected the timeless design intention of Eichler homes," say Sommer and Costello. "Rather than focus purely on historical renovation, we wanted to update the finishes and layout to ensure it lives on for the next generation."
The fireplace is set within a custom blackened steel enclosure with a charred cedar backdrop.
Large slabs of slate were used throughout the home for flooring, adding a natural element.
A lot of the living room furniture came from the Cross-Stitch House, including the Jardan couch and chairs.
Italian designer Renzo Mongiardino revamped the 269-year-old property in the 1980s, enhancing the home's neoclassical and Middle Eastern design detailing.
Tucked away in the rustic-luxe area of Mandeville Canyon, the 3,164-square-foot home offers ample privacy without sacrificing a convenient commute to Los Angeles.
Along the back of the home, an elegantly designed formal living room features large windows along both sides and a marble fireplace.
The windows, which tower over 16 feet, provide plenty of natural light for the cabin.
The living room boasts a bright blue epoxy “rug” and tables fashioned from logs.
The bright yellow skylight was deliberately placed closest to the living spaces in the house, as the color signifies Venus and activity.
Jewel tones and floral prints define the drawing room’s furnishings, which were sourced from around the world. The room’s centerpiece is a large double-face fireplace finished in handmade olive-green ceramic tiles. In the evenings, a champagne cart rolls through the room and a pianist plays in the background.
A velvet, orange sectional pairs with a plush, handwoven rug in the 900-square-foot Alexander Suite, which also features black oak and a grand terrace.
Inside the guest house, exposed beams along the rafters create a barn-like atmosphere, which is enhanced by a double-sided fireplace. Large sliding doors provide natural air circulation and enhance the indoor-outdoor connection.
The Country French style is more apparent in the family room, which features a cathedral ceiling strapped with wooden beams. Natural light seeps into the space from large windows and doors along both sides of the room, as well as dormer windows along the ceiling.
A corner window unit in the living room offers a full view of the  swimming pool, with narrow sight lines and a slim corner post. Additional windows wrap around both sides of the room.
A view down onto the soaring living room.
The main living room has a SixPenny couch; Amazon Home goods including a console table and pillows; art by Julia Kostreva and Tucson-based Trevor Mock; custom bar by Fire on the Mesa; custom coffee table by Tucson woodworker Sam Okerlund; saguaro print by local photographer Emily Tartaglia; rugs by Pampa and Soukie Modern; Serena & Lily woven light fixtures; bar stools, woven coffee table, and hanging chair; Barnaby Lane lounge chairs; and pillows by Collective Sol, Spark Modern, Pampa, and Amazon Home.
A look at the main living area, which opens to the kitchen and looks out onto sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and vast lava escarpments. This entire section of the home retains an indoor-outdoor ambiance created by the large glass doors that open up the front wall.
In the living room, a large built-in sectional with integrated storage frees up floor space and can accommodate more people than freestanding furniture, which would chop up the interior.
The exterior materials are carried inside to a slatted entryway that conceals a utility unit and closet.
Now, a custom, steel-clad fireplace chimney stretches over 4.5 meters tall and imparts a sense of hygge. It was "designed as a contemporary take on the pressed copper flues typical of the era, while complementing and increasing the effect of the existing raked ceilings to the space," says the firm.
The floors and ceiling throughout are American oak. A floor-to-ceiling, plate-glass window measuring 2.8 meters wide (or about nine feet) overlooks the entry courtyard.
Light floods into the indoor/outdoor living area.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
Designed by local architect Pedro Domingos, this four-bedroom abode in Portugal opens up with whitewashed concrete walls and geometric forms. Integrated amongst hundreds of olive, almond, and cork trees on a site that once held ancient ruins, the space opens up to the landscape with an array of patios, rooftop terraces, and large central courtyard with swimming pool. The midcentury fireplace seen here was designed in 1965 by Spanish architects Alfonso Mila and Federico Correa.
The living room pairs neutrals with pops of color—and plenty of pillows and plants.
The large living room also includes an original wood-burning brick fireplace. Solid mahogany floors contrast with the freshly painted walls that flow along the gabled ceiling.
An expansive plate-glass window stretches across the width of the living room, with additional doors leading to the backyard. The open space hosted gatherings of The Mattachine Society.
Once barrels were manufactured here for a London brewery. Now a bright, modern home exists, transformed by Chris Dyson Architects. The basement was expanded, and the mezzanine floor removed to create a triple-height living space. A living wall designed by Scotscape in the dining area, roof terrace, and outdoor shower connect tenants to the outdoors.
The torqued steel showcase wall provides a backdrop to the living and dining spaces and adds a rounded dimension to the otherwise linear forms.
A fireplace wrapped in cedar comes to the rescue on chilly summer nights.
The stunning 80-foot-long glass wall opens up to the outdoors and brings the lake inside.
The large living room offers plenty of seating space. The neutral color scheme fosters a calming ambiance.
In total, there are nine Coastal Pavilions by the bay, with three of them hosting seaside views.
Gracefully curving around an expansive private deck, the pavilions eschew corners. Instead, the unique lines are meant to highlight the curves of the surrounding coastline.
Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former Portland, Oregon, warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.
Anchored by a gas and wood-burning fireplace, the living area is also intimately enclosed by custom-built wooden bookshelves.
Custom-made moon sculptures by New York–based artist Bronsen hang prominently in each Airstream. The decorative pillows are by Cheko.
Amazon offers a range of styles at affordable prices with quick shipping times.
Living Room
The sunken living room is filled with light and leafy greenery.
Little Kulala Lodge is the ultimate destination for modern desert luxury. It’s strategically located on the private Kulala Wilderness Reserve at the foot of Sossusvlei desert.
Nestled in a corner of the home, a quiet sitting area offers an idyllic place to rest and relax.
Having recently been treated to a thoughtful renovation, the reimagined 1961 midcentury offers residents and guests sophisticated balance, as well as a distinct modern allure.
Sprawling across 2,098 square feet, the historic home features an open floor plan with the living room, kitchen, and dining area all seamlessly connected.
Views of the stained-glass windows below flood the penthouse.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.