30 Exterior Metal Siding Material Shipping Container Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

These 20-foot shipping containers are repurposed into stunning luxurious hotel rooms.
Australia-based firm Contained specializes in transforming vessels that originally hauled heavy cargo all over the world into well-designed lodgings. The portable structures have the unique ability to travel almost anywhere. Each 20-foot container easily opens up, flips out, and unfolds into an individual hotel room that opens up to the surrounding landscape, wherever that may be.  
As the story goes, Contained directors Anatoly Mezhov and Irene Polo envisioned these as ephemeral accommodations placed where there were no previous options. Born out of their love of traveling, the idea was to create a portable hotel room for short stays that can be set up anywhere.
Made of scraps taken from the containers’ sides, the roof creates a sense of openness from the inside and ushers in sunlight. Its slanted design creates a wind tower effect, providing natural ventilation that negates the need for air conditioning.
The architect and his team devised an armature on the back of the container that will eventually be covered with vines, concealing the AC and heating unit, the reservoir for graywater and the composting toilet outlet.
Located on the roof of the historic Gilsey House in Manhattan’s NoMad district, this renovated penthouse has an expansive sliding glass door that retracts into the zinc facade, opening up the master suite to a garden terrace with restored historic handrails.
Bold, red-colored shipping containers were used to create a (12 meter long) visitor area extension for the National Theatres Company of Korea. Designed as a social zone for theatregoers, the space was equipped with internal sliding partition walls that can be opened or closed to allow for flexible use of the interior spaces.
One of the main draws of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldmann’s house is its connection to the neighborhood, which is why the front porch was a must. “Homes that have a door but no outside space say, ‘I’m not interested in you,’” designer Christopher Robertson explains. “This says, ‘I’m here to be part of the community.’”
Alongside the redwood shade screen, which keeps the house from overheating, Freeman and Feldmann grow vegetables in an 18-inch-wide garden but frequently bike to nearby eateries for the local Mexican cuisine.
To the right of the house, the couple had a Geosystems FilterPave porous pavement driveway installed. Made of post-consumer recycled glass, the driveway lets water pass through it at an astonishing speed and, in the sun, adds a little sparkle.
The Qiyun Mountain Camp is an extreme sports and adventure park that sits on a 60-acre property in China. LOT-EK designed the public facilities and services within the park, which includes a 15,000-square-foot restaurant plaza that overlooks a river..
Qiyun Mountain Camp Market in Huangshan, China
Bohen Foundation
Apap Open School in Anyang, Korea
PUMA City
C-Home
Poteet describes the space as “unbearably hot” before he used spray-foam insulation between the exterior walls and the interior bamboo. “Now it’s the equivalent of a steel ice chest,” he says.
The container was brought to the property by truck, then the architectural team rented a small crane for around $250 a day to rotate it until they found the right spot for it to rest.
The structure consists of eight shipping containers on the second floor and three on the third floor. To meet the foundation’s slightly variable width, three of the containers were halved and pulled apart toward the front of the house, which also allowed for the insertion of a custom skylight in the main living space.
Purchasing a lot off the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, Martha Moseley and Bill Mathesius adapted an unused concrete foundation—remnants of its previous owner’s abandoned plans—to create a home that’s uniquely their own. “We were inspired by the site, and our desire to have something cool and different,” says Moseley.

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