269 Exterior Glass Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

South street facing facade
Rear view onto vast landscape with strong lines, custom curtain wall and large overhangs to protect form the sunlight
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
The evening view of the glass louvered studio below with the roof deck.
Constructed with wood and Perspex acrylic glass, this semi-transparent volume extends from the side of the main house, blurring the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
The width of the greenhouse volume is equal to the width of the enclosed  volume. "The greenhouse portion and the residential portion are structurally independent while complementing each other's functions," says Snark architectural director Yu Yamada, "enabling expansion, reduction, and renewal of the greenhouse section in the future."
Inspired by Philip Johnson's Glass House, the home was developed in a collaboration between Swedish architect Iver Lofving—an architect at the Philip Johnson Architecture Studio who worked on the iconic Seagram Building—and Athos Zacharias, a moderin abstract painter who was working at the time as a studio assistant to Jackson Pollock and later to Elaine de Kooning.
The thin roof extends over the east side of the entry hall, while a series of skylights allow natural light to pass through. The entrance is on the west side of the glazed entrance.
The steel-framed glazed living pavilion is partly clad in wood and sits atop CMU walls.
"The east façade reveals these distinct parts of the house—the grounded bedroom volume to the north, the glass hallway, which offers a glimpse to otherwise secluded outdoor spaces, and the living pavilion that is lifted above the site to view the forest and pond," the team adds.
The "living pavilion" on the southern wing is elevated to make the space level with the home.
The private bedroom and service rooms are located at the northern street corner and are clad in concrete masonry units.
An exterior shot of the atrium with the succulents.
The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
The structure is slightly elevated by four concrete piers to give optimal support, and the tiny house can be placed in even the most remote areas without the use of heavy machinery.
The wood was simply stained and left in its natural state, and reduced the need for more costly structural steel.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
The stylish midcentury has an elegant profile.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Front facade
“We wanted the exterior to be the artwork,” Ryan says.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
Durable Iroko timber—which when weathered, will match the color tone of the surrounding buildings—has been chosen as cladding for the internal courtyard elevations.
"The building is arranged on a 9.8-foot structural grid, which is expressed both internally and externally to give clarity and order to the composition," says Chapman from OB Architecture.
The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.
The central, rectangular, concrete structure features expansive glazing which showcases the stunning scenery from every angle.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
This airy addition on the back of a historic house in Boise is a model of sensitive renovation, seamlessly melding new and old. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
Glass Farmhouse | Olson Kundig

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