242 Exterior Glass Siding Material Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

M02 by HONOMOBO
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
A team from the University of Coimbra in Portugal designed 'Floatwing'
front elevation towards south....
faccade details
Intrigued by the "smart, simple things" being done with modular housing, Will Arnett tapped architect Suchi Reddy and prefab company LivingHomes to design a house that merges the best of on-site and factory construction. The "Arrested Development" and "LEGO Movie" actor’s new home, completed in 2017, faces down a verdant canyon in Beverly Hills.
With floor-to-ceiling windows, and custom shutter-deck enclosure, the 500 SF cabin feels totally connected to the natural landscape.
Designed by Olson Kundig with interiors by Geremia Design, False Bay Residence takes cues from the surrounding agricultural buildings on the site. A steeply pitched roof, open interior, loft space, and overall height resonate with the vernacular of the area.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Designed by Szu-Ping Patricia Chen Suchart and Thamarit Suchart of Chen + Suchart Studio, the Staab residence stands in stark contrast to its suburban context but in harmony with the Sonoran Desert.
The steel-clad Rolling Huts designed by Olson Kundig Architects in Manzama, Washington, sit lightly on the land thanks to wheels that allow the tiny residences to "hover" above the site, optimizing views of the landscape. Photo by Derek Pirozzi.
A Rolling Hut. Photo by Tim Bies, Olson Kundig Architects.
This 1,000 square-foot weekend cabin in Mazama, Washington, is essentially a "steel box on stilts," according to the firm. The three-story structure, which includes a living room and kitchen, can be completely shuttered when the owner is away.
This 191-square-foot cabin near Vancouver and its glass facades "forces you to engage with the bigger landscape," architect Tom Kundig says, but it seals up tight when its owner is away. The unfinished steel cladding slides over the windows, turning it into a protected bunker. Read the full story here.
A cantilevered cabin designed by R D Gentzler blends into the forest, even as it hovers above a 20-foot drop-off. Its south face is almost entirely glass, but a roof canopy limits solar gain. “We sit on the deck all afternoon watching the trees, and the time just flies by,” says resident Maricela Salas.
Short StackA tiny cabin in the Wisconsin Woods makes a big impact with Johnsen & Schmaling's innovative stacked design. The resulting cozy abode is stylish and durable, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
Project Name: Desert Canopy House

Website: http://www.sander-architects.com/
This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
The home at dusk.
The deceptively simple design makes it a well-recognized masterpiece of midcentury design.
Nestled into its Laurel Canyon location, the home overlooks a shallow rectangular pool.
Recently featured in the pages of Dwell Magazine, this contemporary home is built from five reclaimed shipping containers and is set into a lush Santa Barbara hillside.
The home's main entry—two levels off the street—forces guests to get intimately acquainted with the steep topography of the site. Although the home's residents have the option to enter via garage and interior stair, guests instead travel up exterior stairs at the corner of the site, passing the planted neighboring lot to reach the home's front door.
Earthy, organic materials were favored for the home's composition. The exterior palette features Pietra Serena limestone, color-integral stucco, metal panels, and stained cedar.
A view of the home at night.
In good weather, the owners can open up the exterior glass walls.
Entry to the house is accessed via the gravel arrival court. A floating ledge bridges to the front door, which is located in a "glazed volume set between two of the buildings," said the architects.
The project recently won a Gold Pin in the 2018 Best Design Awards. The judges were impressed with how “the residence settles completely and utterly into its location with exceptional detail, and a sensitivity that responds to its changing environment through the seasons.”
Because the studio does not have air-conditioning, it relies on natural ventilation for passive cooling. Its north orientation harnesses good solar gains.
A view of the main home's sheltered entrance with the annex to the right. All buildings feature continuous exterior insulation.
This annex houses a large recreation room as well as a guest suite.
A dramatic cantilevered roof helps mitigate unwanted solar heat gain while inviting in warm winter light.
To recall the region's past as a historic mining town, a rustic palette of mostly natural materials were applied to the home, including stone, Cor-ten steel, and reclaimed barn wood with modern detailing.
The board-formed concrete, steel, and teak over a rainscreen system blend the building into the site.
Surrounded by rugged beauty, the home was designed with a faceted exterior optimized for wraparound views unique in each room.
This custom residence for actor Will Arnett was inspired by LivingHomes' RK2 model. About a third was built on-site, including a glass staircase tower and a guest wing (featuring a recording booth where Will can ply his trademark baritone).
The C6 is one of LivingHomes' most popular models. Coming in at 1,232 square feet, this LivingHome offers a comfortable living space for a relatively low cost.
A glimpse of the master bedroom framed with full-height windows and sheltered by a deep roof overhang.
The residence is clad in a combination of vertical grain cedar, Firestone aluminum, and Corten standing-seam metal. The stone is Frontier Sandstone.
The extended overhanging roof with its tongue-and-groove hemlock soffit provides shade and shelter to the elevated courtyard.
The modern Montana home is nestled into a transitional zone between a forested butte and a grassy meadow in the western part of the state.
 A garage and gym are contained within the lowest level of the house.
HiveHaus, a UK–based company, designs modern prefab living spaces for a variety of applications. Their prefabricated modules come in the shape of hexagons, and are adaptable, affordable, sustainable, flexible, and easy to construct. These designs consist of a standardized set of components that can be connected together to create interconnecting clusters. The modules are prefabricated offsite, and can be installed in as little as two days, depending on the number of modules, access to the site, and site conditions.
An exterior view of the property.
View from Southwest
West Elevation Detail
View from Boat Dock
Track lighting illuminates the gallery space at night.
Round concrete blocks leading to a sliding door entrance contrast against the volume's unique angular shape.
Full-height glazing mainly wraps around the west and south sides of the structure to frame views of Camelback Mountain.
The new addition sits adjacent to a landscaped courtyard and an existing fire pit. Camelback Mountain can be seen in the distance.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.