Collection by Erika Heet

"Living in a Modern Way" at LACMA

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For their part in the citywide "Pacific Standard Time" exhibition, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has just opened “California Design 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way,” which runs through March 25. One of five PST exhibitions hosted by LACMA, “Living in a Modern Way” takes its title from a quote by the Swedish-born designer Greta Magnusson Grossman, whose simple, functional and stylish pieces in the show help define the principles of the mid-century modern period. In 1951 Grossman declared that California design “is not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions…. It has developed out of our own preference for living in a modern way.” This sentiment is perhaps no better exemplified than within the exhibition’s unprecedented exact reassemblage of the furnishings in Charles and Ray Eames’ Case Study House #8 living room, which brings their philosophy of living—in a modern way—into a context as yet unseen outside their actual home.

For the first time, the living room of the Case Study #8 house in Pacific Palisades has been disassembled and...
Just as in the Eames house, at LACMA’s exhibition the couple’s Lounge Chair is placed against floor-to-ceiling glass...
A molded plywood elephant designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1945.
A pair of 1949 lobster motif swimsuits by L.A. designer Mary Ann DeWeese, who designed for companies such as Sandeze...
La Gardo Tackett created this garden sculpture around 1955 for Architectural Pottery; it comes from the collection of...
Julius Shulman snapped this image in 1947, one year after Richard Neutra completed the Kaufmann House in Palm Springs.
Greta Magnusson Grossman, who was born in Sweden, made this formica, walnut and iron desk for Glenn of California in...
A gunwood dresser with a mirror by R.M. Schindler, made for the Ruth Shep house in Silver Lake, circa 1934–38.
Post-Constructivist jewelry designer Margaret De Patta, a founder of the San Francisco Metal Arts Guild, created this...
Hungarian designer Paul Laszlo created this cotton-rayon textile in 1954 or before; its strong Miró-esque forms evoke a...
An early (1936) trailer by Wallace “Wally” M. Byam, named the Clipper after the popular Pan Am aircraft.
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