Collection by Ali Morris

Into the Woods at Maison & Objet 2012

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As a reaction to throw-away culture in the years following the recession, we have seen age-old woodworking techniques such as cabinetry and parquetry become the focus of high-profile design projects. At Maison & Objet we saw this long-term design movement continue to develop as designers find new ways of working with this durable, fundamental, and essential material to create contemporary design.

This lightweight stool and circular table are hand crafted by Japanese designer Akiko Kuwahata, who is known for...
Kuwahata was actually inspired by an old embroidery ring from Japan, which is made in delicate softwood and stitched...
Ottchil is the name given to the slow and painstaking process of creating Korean lacquer, which is made using the sap...
Also created using the Ottchil technique, these tape measures were made by master of woodwork Kim Wan-Gyu and designed...
Together, Danish textile artist Lisbet Friis and architect Uffe Black designed the Wallpapered table; a portable...
The graphic pattern is printed directly onto the wood using a technique developed by Friis.
This ultra-thin wood by Japanese brand Woodum is woven into fabric to create upholstery, pillows, placemats, and bags.
This handy storage concept by Parisian brand ENO finds a new function for the traditional wooden bristle brush.
Italian brand Slow Design employs the skills of Tuscan artisans to transform old glass bottles into new decorative...
Triangular–, square–, and diamond-shaped wooden boxes have magnets embedded into the sides so that they can join...
Another magnetic wood design was by Brooklyn-based designers Fort Standard.
Twenty giant wooden beads are strung onto the cord of Berlin-based design studio Llot Llov’s Earl lamp.
Pernille Snedker Hansen’s Marbellous wood made a big impact on design blogs and Pinterest boards around the world when...
Usually reserved for making model aircrafts, untreated balsa wood has been used by Nomess Copenhagen to make a modern...
Last but not least, we loved British designer Matt Pugh’s decorative wooden Owls, handmade at his studio in Bath.
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