Collection by Tiffany Chu

Inside the Musee d'Orsay

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Along the left bank of the Seine, the world's most famous museum of impressionistic art had a former life as an old, crumbling train station and hotel. Now, linking the chronological gap between the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou, the Musee d'Orsay in Paris is always a treat to see and experience as a radiant success in adaptive reuse.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of the Musee d'Orsay is the spaciousness of its magnificent vaulted interior.
The original train station-hotel was built by architect Victor Laloux just in time for the World Fair in Paris on...
The conversion of station to museum was headed by French ACT Architecture (Renaud Bardon, Pierre Colboc and Jean-Paul...
Using a structural system consisting of cast iron pillars and metal vaulting, Laloux's design was admired for the fact...
About 12,000 tons of metal was used for the construction of this building—more than that which was used in the Eiffel...
One can clearly see the structural systems at work in this section drawing by Gae Aulenti, impressed on the wall on...
For instance, the language of the metal trussing on the exterior of the vault system was carried over to the...
Natural daylighting illuminates most of the galleries.
Aulenti's team also included lighting consultant Piero Castiglioni and architectural consultant Richard Peduzzi.
To unify the variety of massing, a homogeneous stone covering is used for both floors and walls (and these diagonal...
In addition to the well-known Impressionist works, the museum also boasts a collection of architectural drawings and...
Even larger is the impressive 15 ft x 15 ft site model (at 1/1000 scale) of the 1914 Opera neighborhood in Paris, which...
While lauded for the interior repurposing of existing structures, some criticized the additive volumes to be too...
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