10 Remarkable Warehouse-to-Home Transformations

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By Byron Loker / Published by Dwell
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Industrial structures can be excellent candidates for renovations—their large spaces can either be left open and airy, or divided into conventional rooms. Because they've been created to house heavy goods and machinery, they're also likely to have durable bones.

Take a look at these transformations that have turned industrial warehouses into beautiful, modern homes.

1. Former Soap Warehouse in Tribeca

New York–based architect Andrew Franz undertook the renovation of an 1884 landmark in Tribeca that was formerly a soap warehouse designed by George W. DaCunha. Following a Romanesque Revival style, Franz reorganized and modernized the six-story building, which retains its original 16-foot beam ceilings, brick walls, timber columns, and elevator winches from the former freight shaft by incorporating steel, glass, handmade tile, and lacquer to complement the masonry and heavy timber. An interior courtyard and rectangular mezzanine are situated below the original 16-foot gull-wing ceiling planes.

New York–based architect Andrew Franz undertook the renovation of an 1884 landmark in Tribeca that was formerly a soap warehouse designed by George W. DaCunha. Following a Romanesque Revival style, Franz reorganized and modernized the six-story building, which retains its original 16-foot beam ceilings, brick walls, timber columns, and elevator winches from the former freight shaft by incorporating steel, glass, handmade tile, and lacquer to complement the masonry and heavy timber. An interior courtyard and rectangular mezzanine are situated below the original 16-foot gull-wing ceiling planes.

Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early on to gain permission to unite a home, office, and outdoor area at an aged warehouse that predates the Civil War (according to Sanborn Maps).

Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early on to gain permission to unite a home, office, and outdoor area at an aged warehouse that predates the Civil War (according to Sanborn Maps).

"A high-performance, heavily tinted glass was used within the skylights’ double-glazed units to reduce summer heat," Simpson says. Autex Industries provided the insulation for the year’s cooler months, and the addition of a second, more geometric ceiling hides modern-day electrical and mechanical cords.

"A high-performance, heavily tinted glass was used within the skylights’ double-glazed units to reduce summer heat," Simpson says. Autex Industries provided the insulation for the year’s cooler months, and the addition of a second, more geometric ceiling hides modern-day electrical and mechanical cords.

By burnishing historic details and adjusting the floor plan, multidisciplinary studio Loft Szczecin restored and transformed a loft in a warehouse that dates from before World War II. The living room rug is a Polish textile from the 1930s.

By burnishing historic details and adjusting the floor plan, multidisciplinary studio Loft Szczecin restored and transformed a loft in a warehouse that dates from before World War II. The living room rug is a Polish textile from the 1930s.

Architect David Hill, his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children (from left: Wade, eight, Luke, six, and Breyton, ten), have an unusual home by the standards of their college-town setting in Auburn, Alabama. Built in 1920, the industrial brick building has had previous incarnations as a church, a recycling center, and a pool hall, among others.

Architect David Hill, his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children (from left: Wade, eight, Luke, six, and Breyton, ten), have an unusual home by the standards of their college-town setting in Auburn, Alabama. Built in 1920, the industrial brick building has had previous incarnations as a church, a recycling center, and a pool hall, among others.

A 19th-century New York factory houses both Brandon and Amy Phillips’s apartment and the workshop for their company, Miles & May Furniture Works.

A 19th-century New York factory houses both Brandon and Amy Phillips’s apartment and the workshop for their company, Miles & May Furniture Works.

This repurposed home, which formerly housed famed flower bulb distribution company Cruickshank’s, is now a local landmark in its own right, standing out on the street as a modern reminder of the building’s history. The home’s emphasis on light and linearity is evident even from the street, where carefully placed windows and a combination of stained cedar and Eternit cement-fiber panels create a stunning silhouette.

This repurposed home, which formerly housed famed flower bulb distribution company Cruickshank’s, is now a local landmark in its own right, standing out on the street as a modern reminder of the building’s history. The home’s emphasis on light and linearity is evident even from the street, where carefully placed windows and a combination of stained cedar and Eternit cement-fiber panels create a stunning silhouette.

In Auburn, Alabama, architect David Hill purchased a historic brick building that had served as a Baptist church, pool hall, and barbershop. When renovating the space's interior, Hill made an effort to retain its large, open spaces, and carefully restored the original metal ceiling tiles.

In Auburn, Alabama, architect David Hill purchased a historic brick building that had served as a Baptist church, pool hall, and barbershop. When renovating the space's interior, Hill made an effort to retain its large, open spaces, and carefully restored the original metal ceiling tiles.

When Brill purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for mid-century lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh completely gutted the 1,800-square-foot building and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.

When Brill purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for mid-century lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh completely gutted the 1,800-square-foot building and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.

Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.

Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.