Upside-Down Houses

By David A. Greene / Published by Dwell
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Upside-down houses have been on my mind lately. Like playing a golf hole backwards or turning a painting on its side, seeing a house topsy-turvy causes us to see the ubiquitous in a new and (hopefully) enlightening way.

There's this upside-down house in Germany, this one in Poland, and this long-gone one in Florida. (Plus this other one in Florida, where you can play laser tag.)
 
And in the New York Times, there's a nice little article about a modern Scottish upside-down house, which in 1959 was a radical departure from the way people were used to living—with the dirty, hot, and traffic-heavy areas downstairs, and the clean, quiet, burglar-and-badger-resistant areas upstairs.

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David A. Greene

@david_a_greene

Dave has contributed to Dwell since its inception. He's a CalArts dropout, a former art critic for The New Yorker, and a producer of comedies on TV. He lives in, and writes from, Los Angeles.

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