This Century-Old Bungalow Is an Eternal Work-in-Progress

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By Luke Hopping
Its true renaissance started 10 years ago with two new, dedicated owners.

Lori Andrews’ downtown Calgary home can seem at first like a merry hodgepodge: The lighting in the communal area alone includes a chandelier, two transparent pendants, and some sophisticated David Weeks sconces. But look a little closer and the contrasting elements start to coalesce into an inevitable whole. If the furnishings appear a little miscellaneous, Lori notes, it’s because they were accumulated incrementally, over the course of a decade. 

This Century-Old Bungalow Is an Eternal Work-in-Progress - Photo 1 of 4 - Lori Andrews and Ken Corner continue to add furniture to their Calgary home. The black leather Montauk sofa was the first piece Lori ever bought; the orange Pierre Paulin Tulip lounge chair was a birthday gift to Ken. 

Lori Andrews and Ken Corner continue to add furniture to their Calgary home. The black leather Montauk sofa was the first piece Lori ever bought; the orange Pierre Paulin Tulip lounge chair was a birthday gift to Ken. 

Lori, an interior designer and photographer, purchased the 1915 bungalow in 2006 with her husband, Ken Corner. Since then, it’s been the subject of a series of ongoing, tactical renovations. "I’m very concerned with the wasteful nature of poorly thought renovations and throw-it-away decorating attitudes," she explains. 

This Century-Old Bungalow Is an Eternal Work-in-Progress - Photo 2 of 4 - The backsplash is an exuberant mix of colorful tile. "We used a randomizer algorithm to design the multi-colored non-pattern," says Lori.    

The backsplash is an exuberant mix of colorful tile. "We used a randomizer algorithm to design the multi-colored non-pattern," says Lori.    

To date, they’ve gutted the bathrooms, replaced the flooring with Scandinavian-inspired Karhs engineered ash wood, and painted the principal rooms white, at the same time as they’ve introduced powerful bursts of color in the form of artwork and monochromatic furniture.  

This Century-Old Bungalow Is an Eternal Work-in-Progress - Photo 3 of 4 - While addressing plumbing problems, the residents took time to spruce up the bathrooms, adding new tile, fixtures, and, in one, a cheery yellow cabinet. 

While addressing plumbing problems, the residents took time to spruce up the bathrooms, adding new tile, fixtures, and, in one, a cheery yellow cabinet. 

The house measures 1,180 square feet, meaning its undergone more work than many spaces twice its size. But meticulousness pays dividends when designing a permanent dwelling, says Lori: "Working this way has enabled us to purchase higher quality materials and furnishings that we hope will last our lifetime."

 

This Century-Old Bungalow Is an Eternal Work-in-Progress - Photo 4 of 4 - A red gym locker, repurposed as storage, is a whimsical touch in the bedroom.

A red gym locker, repurposed as storage, is a whimsical touch in the bedroom.