These 8 Homes in Texas Will Convert You Into a Prefab Fanatic

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By Michele Koh Morollo
From shipping containers to multi-modular holiday retreats, these sleek prefabs prove style does not have to be compromised with off-site construction.

Acclaimed for being cost-efficient, sustainable, and stylish, it's no wonder why prefabricated homes are being embraced with open arms. Although these carefully crafted properties are popping up all across the globe, we can't get enough of the prefab action currently taking place in Texas. Keep scrolling to see eight of our favorite designs below.

1. Steel Grid Boathouse

Architecture and design firm Andersson-Wise designed a prefab steel-grid boathouse for the Martin family. After delivering the orthogonal frame by truck from Houston, the team then transported it by barge to the home's final site in Austin. 

"We wanted to make a delicate mark on the landscape, without blending into it outright," says Andersson.

"We wanted to make a delicate mark on the landscape, without blending into it outright," says Andersson.

2. Modern Austin Prefab

With the help of local carpenters and craftsmen, Aamodt / Plumb—a "slow architecture" team from Cambridge, Massachusetts—created this modern prefab in Austin from reclaimed materials. 

The roof, wall, and floor panels were constructed off-site. They were then combined with exposed timber frames to create an energy-efficient structure that allowed for expedited construction time.

New York designer Bella Mancini scoured Austin shops such as Spartan and Mockingbird Domestics for the relaxed mix of furniture and accessories.

New York designer Bella Mancini scoured Austin shops such as Spartan and Mockingbird Domestics for the relaxed mix of furniture and accessories.

3. Petit Prefab on a West Texas Ranch

Designed by Alchemy Architects in Saint Paul, Minnesota, this 600-square-foot prefab is sited within a 30,000-acre ranch in West Texas. 

It is comprised of two modules: one that houses the living area, and one that features the utility and laundry area, as well as the outdoor kitchen. Both modules were built in a factory in Utah before being delivered to the ranch where they were installed by crane.

The concrete plinth supports the planters and deck, while concealing a foundation of pylons.

The concrete plinth supports the planters and deck, while concealing a foundation of pylons.

4. Blue Container in San Antonio

San Antonio–based architect Jim Poteet wrangled an 8-by-40-foot steel shipping container and transformed it into a playhouse, guesthouse, and retreat for art-lover Stacey Hill. 

Poteet placed the container on a foundation made of recycled telephone poles, then added bamboo floors and wall coverings, as well as full-height glass doors and windows. "The container, as we call it, is a great escape for me because the space is pure, uncluttered, wonderfully sunlit, quiet, and has a great view of my garden," says Hill. 

Poteet replaced one wall with a large steel-and-glass, lift-and-slide window wall, which he says makes the best use of indirect light. "The big sliding door and picture window make the 250-square-foot living space feel big," says owner Stacey Hill.

Poteet replaced one wall with a large steel-and-glass, lift-and-slide window wall, which he says makes the best use of indirect light. "The big sliding door and picture window make the 250-square-foot living space feel big," says owner Stacey Hill.

5. Contain Builders' Mod 320A

Contain Builders—Austin’s first fully functional modular/container home builders—have recently created the 320A Mod. This small, sustainable container home houses 320 square feet and is composed of two 20-foot containers with four-feet offsets. 

The 320A Mod features a fully equipped kitchen, bedroom, and bathroom. It also has a spacious living area and is comprised of 320 square feet.

The 320A Mod features a fully equipped kitchen, bedroom, and bathroom. It also has a spacious living area and is comprised of 320 square feet.

6. Three-generational Compound in Wimberley

To accommodate visits from their children and grandchildren, Scott Wallace and Tara Coco hired San Antonio firm Lake|Flato Architects to adapt the company's modular Porch House system and create a family compound. This structure is sited on the banks of Blanco River, and houses cozy private spaces, along with serene communal areas outdoors.

Scott Wallace and Tara Coco turned to Lake|Flato Architects to create a family compound on the banks of the Blanco River in Wimberley, Texas. The design integrates private spaces with public gathering spots, including a deck that serves as an outdoor living room.

Scott Wallace and Tara Coco turned to Lake|Flato Architects to create a family compound on the banks of the Blanco River in Wimberley, Texas. The design integrates private spaces with public gathering spots, including a deck that serves as an outdoor living room.

7. Ma Modular’s Casita 850

In 2001, Austin architect Chris Krager founded Ma Modular, an offshoot of his design and build firm KRDB that focuses on affordable, modern, modular architecture. 

One of the models that the company offers is the 850-square-foot Casita 850, which is a light-filled, two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit with high ceilings and a generous outdoor deck.

At 850 square feet, the Casita 850 delivers ample space and comfort. It features two bedrooms and one bathroom. It even comes with a spacious outdoor deck.

At 850 square feet, the Casita 850 delivers ample space and comfort. It features two bedrooms and one bathroom. It even comes with a spacious outdoor deck.

8. Dvele Modular Homes

Although Dvele is headquartered in San Francisco, California,  it is currently working on modular homes in Austin, San Antonio, and Fredericksburg. The company is acclaimed for designing healthy, eco-friendly homes all across the country, and plants 10,000 trees for every new home built as part of their "Plant a Billion Trees" campaign.

To offset their carbon footprint, Dvele plants 10,000 trees for every new home they build as part of their "Plant a Billion Trees" campaign. 

To offset their carbon footprint, Dvele plants 10,000 trees for every new home they build as part of their "Plant a Billion Trees" campaign.