Solid Table from Normann Copenhagen

By Diana Budds / Published by Dwell
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Back in 2012, we reported on a marble-and-elm table by Norwegian designer Lars Beller Fjetland. At the time, he was just finishing up school at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts and exhibited his work with other students in the Greenhouse section. Since then, the prototype has been picked up by Normann Copenhagen and was released at the 2013 Milan Furniture Fair. The piece is now available from normann-copenhagen.com.

Often using found materials, Fjetland creates designs that have a very refined sensibility and an emphasis on craft. His Japan- and Nordic-inspired Solid table held together by pegs and the weight of the Cararra marble slab used as a table top is a nod to traditional furniture making techniques. Here's what Fjetland told us about the concept: "I believe that the Nordic crafting culture has a lot in common with the Japanese crafting culture. We both share a common respect, knowledge and passion in our native materials."

Here's a detail of the table. It's held together by the weight of the marble slab used as a top. "I wanted to keep the construction as clean and simple as possible so I looked into traditional joints used in basic carpentry," says Fjetland. "It might sound silly, but one of the key attributes of stone is that it’s rather heavy. I used the weight of the tabletop to lock the whole construction. The wooden pegs keep the stone in place and they are also prevent the solid wood flanges from getting deformed by humidity."

Here's a detail of the table. It's held together by the weight of the marble slab used as a top. "I wanted to keep the construction as clean and simple as possible so I looked into traditional joints used in basic carpentry," says Fjetland. "It might sound silly, but one of the key attributes of stone is that it’s rather heavy. I used the weight of the tabletop to lock the whole construction. The wooden pegs keep the stone in place and they are also prevent the solid wood flanges from getting deformed by humidity."

It's been a busy year for Fjetland as his cork-topped Drifted stool was put into production by Discipline. We can't wait to see what's next from him! For more on his work, and that of other rising design stars, pick up a copy of our Global Style issue.

Diana Budds

@dianabudds

A New York-based writer, Diana studied art history and environmental policy at UC Davis. Before rising to Senior Editor at Dwell—where she helped craft product coverage, features, and more—Diana worked in the Architecture and Design departments at MoMA and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She counts finishing a 5K as one of her greatest accomplishments, gets excited about any travel involving trains, and her favorite magazine section is Rewind. Learn more about Diana at: http://dianabudds.com

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