Recycled Tube Light by Castor

By Johanna Björk / Published by Dwell
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The Recycled Tube Light by Canadian design studio Castor is a great example of upcycling done right. Using recycled materials—burnt-out fluorescent tube lights—in an unexpected, innovative way, it challenges our notions of waste.

The fluorescent bulbs have been reclaimed from architecturally significant buildings in Canada, such as the TD Tower designed by Mies van der Rohe, Toronto’s Old City Hall and the University of Toronto.

Made from recycled fluorescent bulbs, steel, rubber and hardware, the Recycled Tube Light measures 8" x 69" and is a great example of creative upcycling. Photo courtesy of Matter.

Made from recycled fluorescent bulbs, steel, rubber and hardware, the Recycled Tube Light measures 8" x 69" and is a great example of creative upcycling. Photo courtesy of Matter.

The circularly arranged fluorescent bulbs have been reclaimed from architecturally significant buildings in Canada—like the Mies van der Rohe’s TD Tower, Toronto’s Old City Hall and the University of Toronto. Photo courtesy of Matter.

The circularly arranged fluorescent bulbs have been reclaimed from architecturally significant buildings in Canada—like the Mies van der Rohe’s TD Tower, Toronto’s Old City Hall and the University of Toronto. Photo courtesy of Matter.

The fluorescent tubes are arranged in a circle formation and are lit from the inside, using centrally placed (functioning) bulbs. The light that shines through is warm and soft and perfectly suited to lending an eclectic yet friendly industrial edge to any space.

The fluorescent tubes are lit from the inside, using centrally placed (functioning) bulbs, giving off a soft, warm light. Photo courtesy of Matter.

The fluorescent tubes are lit from the inside, using centrally placed (functioning) bulbs, giving off a soft, warm light. Photo courtesy of Matter.

Johanna Björk

@johannabjrk

A designer by trade, Johanna Björk has always had a passion for storytelling and style. She currently works in the intersection of design, fashion and sustainability and is the founder of web magazine Goodlifer. Born and raised in Sweden, she's lived and worked in Miami, Brooklyn and is currently based in the LA-area. As Editor of Goodlifer, columnist for conscious culture site EcoSalon (ecosalon.com), and a freelance writer, she reports on the latest and greatest in good living, sustainable style, culture and trends from all over the world.

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