20 Spectacular Warehouse-to-Home Conversions

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By Michele Koh Morollo
Featuring expansive floor plans, high ceilings, and edgy industrial elements, these unique designs take warehouse-to-home renovations to the next level.

While they were first built to store raw materials and manufactured goods, old warehouses have since gained popularity thanks to their grand potential of being revamped into stylish, modern homes. Whether designed with new walls to create a division of spaces, or left open for a loftier, more voluminous feel, these industrial gems can provide a superb blank canvas for homeowners, architects and designers looking to create unique, hardworking spaces in structures with fascinating pasts. Scroll ahead to see 20 of our favorite warehouse-to-home conversions.

1. A Former Soap Warehouse in Tribeca

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New York–based architect Andrew Franz undertook the renovation of an 1884 landmark in Tribeca that was formerly a soap warehouse designed by George W. DaCunha. Following a Romanesque Revival style, Franz reorganized and modernized the six-story building, which retains its original 16-foot beam ceilings, brick walls, timber columns, and elevator winches from the former freight shaft by incorporating steel, glass, handmade tile, and lacquer to complement the masonry and heavy timber. An interior courtyard and rectangular mezzanine are situated below the original gull-wing ceiling planes.

New York–based architect Andrew Franz undertook the renovation of an 1884 landmark in Tribeca that was formerly a soap warehouse designed by George W. DaCunha. Following a Romanesque Revival style, Franz reorganized and modernized the six-story building, which retains its original 16-foot beam ceilings, brick walls, timber columns, and elevator winches from the former freight shaft by incorporating steel, glass, handmade tile, and lacquer to complement the masonry and heavy timber. An interior courtyard and rectangular mezzanine are situated below the original gull-wing ceiling planes.

Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early on to gain permission to unite a home, office, and outdoor area to an aged warehouse that predates the Civil War.

Web developer Rich Yessian involved local preservation groups early on to gain permission to unite a home, office, and outdoor area to an aged warehouse that predates the Civil War.

Autex Industries provided the insulation for the year’s cooler months, and the addition of a second, more geometric ceiling hides modern-day electrical and mechanical cords.

Autex Industries provided the insulation for the year’s cooler months, and the addition of a second, more geometric ceiling hides modern-day electrical and mechanical cords.

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Menu Moon Vase
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By burnishing historic details and adjusting the floor plan, multidisciplinary studio Loft Szczecin restored and transformed a loft in a warehouse that dates from before World War II. The living room rug is a Polish textile from the 1930s.

By burnishing historic details and adjusting the floor plan, multidisciplinary studio Loft Szczecin restored and transformed a loft in a warehouse that dates from before World War II. The living room rug is a Polish textile from the 1930s.

Architect David Hill, his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children (from left: Wade, eight; Luke, six; and Breyton, ten), have an unusual home by the standards of their college-town setting in Auburn, Alabama. Built in 1920, the industrial brick building has had previous incarnations as a church, a recycling center, and a pool hall, among others.

Architect David Hill, his wife, Elizabeth, and their three children (from left: Wade, eight; Luke, six; and Breyton, ten), have an unusual home by the standards of their college-town setting in Auburn, Alabama. Built in 1920, the industrial brick building has had previous incarnations as a church, a recycling center, and a pool hall, among others.

A 19th-century New York factory houses both Brandon and Amy Phillips’s apartment and the workshop for their company, Miles & May Furniture Works.

A 19th-century New York factory houses both Brandon and Amy Phillips’s apartment and the workshop for their company, Miles & May Furniture Works.

This repurposed home, which formerly housed famed flower bulb distribution company Cruickshank’s, is now a local landmark in its own right, standing out on the street as a modern reminder of the building’s history. The home’s emphasis on light and linearity is evident even from the street, where carefully placed windows and a combination of stained cedar and Eternit cement-fiber panels create a stunning silhouette.

This repurposed home, which formerly housed famed flower bulb distribution company Cruickshank’s, is now a local landmark in its own right, standing out on the street as a modern reminder of the building’s history. The home’s emphasis on light and linearity is evident even from the street, where carefully placed windows and a combination of stained cedar and Eternit cement-fiber panels create a stunning silhouette.

In Auburn, Alabama, architect David Hill purchased a historic brick building that had served as a Baptist church, pool hall, and barbershop. When renovating the space's interior, Hill made an effort to retain its large, open spaces, and carefully restored the original metal ceiling tiles.

In Auburn, Alabama, architect David Hill purchased a historic brick building that had served as a Baptist church, pool hall, and barbershop. When renovating the space's interior, Hill made an effort to retain its large, open spaces, and carefully restored the original metal ceiling tiles.

When Brill (the homeowner) purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for midcentury lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh completely gutted the 1,800-square-foot building and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.

When Brill (the homeowner) purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for midcentury lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh completely gutted the 1,800-square-foot building and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.

Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.

Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.

New York City architecture and interior design firm Fogarty Finger transformed this former factory for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers—a company that made wooden forms which were then cast in metal for propellers—into a whooping 8,500-square-foot residence with a new second floor and an excavated cellar. 

New York City architecture and interior design firm Fogarty Finger transformed this former factory for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers—a company that made wooden forms which were then cast in metal for propellers—into a whooping 8,500-square-foot residence with a new second floor and an excavated cellar. 

In the mid-1970s, the abandoned Sansón Cement Factory, which is five miles outside Barcelona in the village of Sant Just Desvern, was turned into the home of architect Ricardo Bofill and the headquarters for his firm, Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura.

In the mid-1970s, the abandoned Sansón Cement Factory, which is five miles outside Barcelona in the village of Sant Just Desvern, was turned into the home of architect Ricardo Bofill and the headquarters for his firm, Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura.

Architect Rupert Scott and his wife, interior designer Leo Wood, gutted and redesigned this old, dark London gin distillery, and made it their bright, modern family home. Scott, who is the founder and director of Hackney–based Open Practice Architecture, was responsible for the architectural work, while Wood, founder and director of Kinder Design, took care of the interiors.

Architect Rupert Scott and his wife, interior designer Leo Wood, gutted and redesigned this old, dark London gin distillery, and made it their bright, modern family home. Scott, who is the founder and director of Hackney–based Open Practice Architecture, was responsible for the architectural work, while Wood, founder and director of Kinder Design, took care of the interiors.

Studio David Thulstrup incorporated green spaces into this old pencil factory in Copenhagen to transform it into a modern home for photographer Peter Krasilnikoff.

Studio David Thulstrup incorporated green spaces into this old pencil factory in Copenhagen to transform it into a modern home for photographer Peter Krasilnikoff.

Built as a warehouse, this 2,200-square-foot, one-bedroom home in East London kept its original layout, but now has an open bedroom on the mezzanine level.

Built as a warehouse, this 2,200-square-foot, one-bedroom home in East London kept its original layout, but now has an open bedroom on the mezzanine level.

In the suburb of Annandale, architect Julian Brenchley revamped the warehouse home of Australian painter Fred Cress to such a high standard that it won the Master Builders Association of New South Wales’ Excellence in Housing Award in 2015. 

In the suburb of Annandale, architect Julian Brenchley revamped the warehouse home of Australian painter Fred Cress to such a high standard that it won the Master Builders Association of New South Wales’ Excellence in Housing Award in 2015. 

Feix&Merlin Architects raised the ceilings, removed a concrete plinth, and excavated approximately 3.28 feet below the original level of this 1,350-square-foot grain warehouse along London to create a cool, modern home with a lofty, double-height space over the kitchen.

Feix&Merlin Architects raised the ceilings, removed a concrete plinth, and excavated approximately 3.28 feet below the original level of this 1,350-square-foot grain warehouse along London to create a cool, modern home with a lofty, double-height space over the kitchen.

Formerly the site of a French polishing company in the 20th century, this building in Clerkenwell, London, was converted by Chris Dyson Architects in 2015 into a residence with an expanded basement and triple-height living space that allows a dramatic feature staircase to take center stage.

Formerly the site of a French polishing company in the 20th century, this building in Clerkenwell, London, was converted by Chris Dyson Architects in 2015 into a residence with an expanded basement and triple-height living space that allows a dramatic feature staircase to take center stage.

James Davies of London–based architect and design studio Paper House Project took a run-down warehouse and turned it into a modern two-bedroom abode.

James Davies of London–based architect and design studio Paper House Project took a run-down warehouse and turned it into a modern two-bedroom abode.

Texan artist Tim Stokes and his partner, Nathalie Wolberg, left their pint-size Parisian apartment behind to undertake a hands-on renovation of an industrial, 6,000-square-foot warehouse in Antwerp, Belgium. It’s now home to an expansive live/work space containing two studios—one for each of them—two exhibition galleries, and an integrated courtyard. 

Texan artist Tim Stokes and his partner, Nathalie Wolberg, left their pint-size Parisian apartment behind to undertake a hands-on renovation of an industrial, 6,000-square-foot warehouse in Antwerp, Belgium. It’s now home to an expansive live/work space containing two studios—one for each of them—two exhibition galleries, and an integrated courtyard.