A Greek Island Wants to Pay You $565 a Month to Move There

If you've ever dreamt of island living, consider this: the Aegean isle of Antikythera will actually pay you to move in.

A jewel of an island between Crete and Greece's mainland is incentivizing young, vibrant folk to relocate with a pretty attractive deal: Prospective residents with young children will get a plot of land, a home, and three-months of subsidized living—not to mention the benefits of the idyllic seaside climate. 

The current population (which is about the size of two basketball teams, and doubles in the summer months) is a dedicated bunch eager to expand. Those with trade skills—like baking, fishing, stock farming, or building—are especially encouraged to apply. "These are professions for which we can guarantee a decent income," says local council president Andreas Charchalakis.

The mediterranean island is home to an array of succulents and chaparral. The white and blue buildings are a signature of the region. 

The mediterranean island is home to an array of succulents and chaparral. The white and blue buildings are a signature of the region. 

The town was largely untouched by the development boom of the ’60s and ’70s. It's accessible via a ferry that carries cars and passengers.

The town was largely untouched by the development boom of the ’60s and ’70s. It's accessible via a ferry that carries cars and passengers.

Does that deal sound too good to be true? Antikythera—like Greece as a whole—has been facing hard times as of late. The country's growing dogpile of issues includes a rocky economy, a declining birthrate, and an aging population. With help from the local diocese of the Greek Orthodox Church, and chutzpah from spirited locals, the island is taking steps to reverse these symptoms, at least on its own turf.

A beacon of light on the foggy horizon, the island's shuttered schoolhouse just opened to the children of four new families for the first time in 24 years. After a visit by Greek president Prokopis Pavlopoulos—whose entourage outnumbered actual residents—the church set about preparing the four Athens–area families for relocation to the unspoiled island.

A wash of muted colors pops against the turquoise and teal Aegean Sea.

A wash of muted colors pops against the turquoise and teal Aegean Sea.

Off Antikythera's coast, Jacques-Yves Cousteau mined a shipwreck from which came the Antikythera mechanism—the world's oldest known computer—along with bronze statues, 36 marble sculptures, and a bounty of other significant Greek treasures. The island surely has more to be discovered. 

Families with young children and the dream of island living are encouraged to apply.

Related Reading: You Can Buy a Historic Home in Italy For Just €1

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