Book It: A Shoppable Finnish B&B Pops Up in Paris

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By Heather Corcoran / Published by Dwell
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Your own private Nordic cottage in the City of Light? No problem.

There's a long tradition of aitta, or no-frills countryside cottages, in Finland. And now the cozy concept is hitting the road with the Mobile Home 2017 project—part of the Nordic nation's centennial celebration.

First stop: Paris. There, six Finnish-style cabins will pop up on the Left Bank for 100 days beginning in January 2017. 

Designed by Linda Bergroth, the spruce timber structures are meant to evoke the simple pleasures of <i>aitta</i>, traditional Finnish country houses.

Designed by Linda Bergroth, the spruce timber structures are meant to evoke the simple pleasures of aitta, traditional Finnish country houses.

Called Koti (that's Finnish for "home"), the living installation takes place at the Institut Finlandais, with bookings available now through Airbnb.

The project was created by Linda Bergroth, a designer who splits her time between Helsinki and Paris. She drew on the cabin typology to evoke the feeling of a haven, one where overnight visitors can truly escape the busy city.

Koti's six structures accommodate up to 12 guests, who are encouraged to socialized around a communal table in the shared courtyard space.

Koti's six structures accommodate up to 12 guests, who are encouraged to socialized around a communal table in the shared courtyard space.

"In Finland, as in much of the rest of the world, home is where the heart is. But just as important to the idea of home comforts is the countryside cabin: frequent, refreshing visits to the cabin, often shared with family members, are considered an essential part of everyday life."

—Linda Bergroth, designer

Koti guests are greeted with a robe and slippers by Lapuan Kankurit, a textile company run by fourth-generation weaver.

Koti guests are greeted with a robe and slippers by Lapuan Kankurit, a textile company run by fourth-generation weaver.

The six spruce timber cabins—each accommodating up to two guests—will be situated around a shared central courtyard that will be activated with a series of performances, talks, concerts, and restaurant nights.

To further capture the feeling of Finland, the space is filled with local designs including clean-lined wood furniture by architects Mattila & Merz for Fiskars-based brand Nikari. 

Each morning will begin with a breakfast of traditional Nordic fare, including rye bread and berries from Food from Finland, served in custom ceramic tableware by Nathalie Lahdenmaki.&nbsp;

Each morning will begin with a breakfast of traditional Nordic fare, including rye bread and berries from Food from Finland, served in custom ceramic tableware by Nathalie Lahdenmaki. 

Other homegrown treats include bedding, robes, slippers by Lapuan Kankurit, a family-run textile company that now in its fourth generation; tabletop ceramics by Nathalie Lahdenmaki; and Piippu coffee pots by Kaksikko—and everything is available for purchase should you see a souvenir.

"Getting back to nature in a simple cabin," Bergroth says, "can help us all to reconnect with family and friends and unwind from the pressures and responsibilities of day-to-day life." 

Now you can do it without ever leaving the city center.

Koti will feature textiles by Lapuan Kankurit and furniture designed by architects Mattila &amp; Merz for Nikari.

Koti will feature textiles by Lapuan Kankurit and furniture designed by architects Mattila & Merz for Nikari.

Rooms from 90 Euros. Booking is now available through Airbnb.

Cover image by Linda Linko for Institut Finlandais.