8 Beautiful Home Projects Using Reclaimed Wood

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Wood in general is a beautiful, evocative natural material, and when it's saved from a landfill and reused, it has even more character, history, and sustainability.

Reclaimed wood can be recovered from a wide variety of sources, but it most frequently comes from timber framing and decking used in old barns, factories, and warehouses. Some tell-tale signs of reclaimed wood include nail holes, manufacturer stamps, and markings. Other unique qualities, like variation and depth of color or unusual patterning, can be a result of it being stored in vessels like wine barrels, beer casks, and other containers. Additionally, reclaimed timber is usually cut from strong, mature trees (unlike the younger, weaker trees used today for lumber), and is less prone to splitting. Because of these aspects, many designers choose to use reclaimed wood rather than virgin timber in their projects. 

Here, we take a look at eight different projects that incorporate reclaimed wood in distinct ways.





8 Beautiful Home Projects Using Reclaimed Wood - Photo 5 of 8 - This loft in Brooklyn, New York, used almost all reclaimed, recycled, or diseased wood for everything from the flooring—salvaged from a barn constructed in the 1800s in the Allegheny Mountains in Ohio—to the doors, which were saved from a mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Shelving, walls, and ceilings throughout the apartment are covered with wood that came from butternut trees in a blighted forest in Vermont, where worm infestations created intricate, unique patterns in the diseased wood. Although the apartment is located in New York, the different pieces of lumber inside come from all over the country.

This loft in Brooklyn, New York, used almost all reclaimed, recycled, or diseased wood for everything from the flooring—salvaged from a barn constructed in the 1800s in the Allegheny Mountains in Ohio—to the doors, which were saved from a mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Shelving, walls, and ceilings throughout the apartment are covered with wood that came from butternut trees in a blighted forest in Vermont, where worm infestations created intricate, unique patterns in the diseased wood. Although the apartment is located in New York, the different pieces of lumber inside come from all over the country.