384 Kitchen Ceiling Lighting Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Concrete countertops surround a 36" apron sink in the kitchen and top a seating area at one end. The counters were designed flush with a large window in the back to allow for easier passing of items through to the outside.
The angles of the kitchen island mimic the fireplace detail. There’s a door to a walk-in pantry concealed in the cabinetry.
Ebonized oak cabinetry anchors the kitchen. Smoked mirror forms the backsplash, "to reflect the view even when you're turned away from it," says Megowan.
The kitchen island is made from formwork concrete, echoing the materiality of the walls, with a polished black granite top. “The countertop is very precise and sharp, which contrasts with the rustic concrete island,” says architect Rodrigo Simão. “It’s a very interesting mix.”
The vintage glass pendant lights were found on Etsy—one of the designer’s favorite resources. “I am not a flea market person. I just don’t have the stamina,” says Zachary. “But when it comes to Etsy, I’m just, like, ‘Okay, I can handle this.’”
Zachary brought in new counter stools from Rejuvenation.
The existing cabinets were painted Card Room Green by Farrow & Ball.
Since there was plenty of storage, Zachary took down the upper cabinets and replaced them with a Logan wall rack from Lostine.
The kitchen is located in a bespoke timber joinery unit that divides the “living shed.” The timber has been stained black to contrast with the surrounding timber cladding, and brass counters and backsplashes echo the use of brass details throughout the interior. “Brass was a very special material—used sparingly—that has come to be a hallmark of the project,” says architect Ben Shields.
The U-shaped kitchen was designed by Kristen to give children a space for homework and snacks away from the work area.
Mutuus Studio cofounders Saul and Kristen Becker remodeled the kitchen of their 1954 dwelling over a three year period, finishing it this year.
The midcentury kitchen remodel by Mutuus Studio offers views to the front, the driveway, and the back.
Guests enter the home by walking through the kitchen, following the same layout that existed when architect David Webber arrived on the scene; however, the sophisticated materials and warm lighting make the space much more inviting than it was before.
Two friends spent three years reviving this 16th-century Basque church near Bilbao, Spain. Abandoned since the late 1970s, the church was in need of serious repair. The roof had caved in and vegetation had thoroughly invaded the structure. Built in the mid-16th century, with some add-ons in the form of an 18th-century bell tower and sacristy, the church had obvious archaeological and historical value.
Kitchen
Dignard fitted out the interior with a medley of woods—cedar, larch, and aspen—and added shou sugi ban accents, such as the mountain scene running across the kitchen cabinets. The couch folds out for an extra bed.
A local blacksmith fabricated metal elements for the doors, shelves, and light fittings throughout the house.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.
Now, the sizeable kitchen is an exceptional blend of old and new. The original floors, coffered ceiling, and windows are joined with IKEA cabinets with Semihandmade fronts, and Vermont-sourced Danby marble counters.
The backsplash is composed of Fireclay tile, the floating shelves are from Semihandmade, and the light above the island is by Andrew Neyer. The Virgin of Guadalupe painting that the couple picked up in a flea market in Mexico City is an ode to the home’s Catholic rectory past.
The white terrazzo floor was made the "old-school" way, in situ with large marble stones. The counters are Silestone Black Tebas.
The new kitchen has facilitated lessons in cooking for the couple. "We wanted a big, comfortable kitchen to learn how to cook," says Martin. "We invented a method where we invite friends to cook with us, and we learn by doing."
The communal kitchen in the main house provides a space for guests to gather and cook together. This space is sleek and modern with hardware-less marine-grade plywood cabinets and a large, concrete island with seating.
White quartz for the island and countertops offsets dramatic blue cabinetry in the kitchen of this modern home in Sun Valley, Idaho, designed by Sarah Latham.
“We removed all those walls so that when you walk in, you have these expanded views out into the landscape. We opened up the living area, and made the kitchen virtually three times larger than it was,” says French.
The front and back doors are only 12 feet apart from one another, separated by the living space at the heart of the home. The open floor plan allows the living space, den, dining room, and kitchen to flow into each other, while the way the volumes are positioned makes each space feel distinct—this works well for entertaining both large and small groups.
A full-length skylight above the floating steel shelf in the kitchen allows light to stream across the Venetian plaster wall and bounce off the high-gloss white shelf. “It creates an ever-changing and ethereal experience,” says designer Jamie Chioco. The ceramic dishes and plates displayed on the shelf are from Kinn Home.
The island bar in the kitchen features white Arcilla Field tiles by Ann Sacks that match the turquoise tiles used in the guest bathroom. The lights above the bench are classic VL45 Radiohus pendants, which were originally designed in the 1940s by Danish architect Vilhelm Lauritzen for Louis Poulsen for the construction of the Radiohuset building in Copenhagen.
In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
The view back into the kitchen frames the inset wood shelves, and allows one component of the work triangle, the stove, to stay tucked out of sight.
Tembo stools by Note Designs Studio add cheer to the serene kitchen.
The stove was kept in place in order to retain the position of the gas and venting. The designer dropped the sill on the right-side window to the floor. Sleek black cabinetry is topped with Essastone Concrete Pezzato weathered stone on the perimeter, and custom terrazzo on the island.
“We don’t need the full ‘breakfast bar’ that is a feature of so many modern kitchens, as we make a point of eating together as a family at the table for meals,” say the clients. “The stools under the cantilevered bench are usually used while chopping vegetables with a glass of wine in hand.”
Bright red laminate shelves hold the family’s coffee supplies in a delightful reveal.
A wall of custom blackbutt cabinetry conceals the fridge and lots of storage.
The kitchen was relocated to its designated place and reinstalled as per White’s building specs. A stainless-steel counter and sink, powder-coated cabinets, and sliding panels in pastels replicate the original 1955 version while contemporary updates include Vola faucets, Heath Ceramics tiles, sliding freezer drawers, an induction range, and a refrigerator by Jennair.
“For me, it was very important to use materials which last and age with grace,” Schalgien says of the Verde Guatemala countertops.
“One night when we sat and had a dinner, I said I would design this neon for his kitchen because it would be perfect,” Schwalgien says, “and then he agreed to it.”
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
“For the ceiling dome above the cooking area, the exaggerated style and pattern add whimsy to the space and conceal the required equipment and piping,” explains the firm.
A small kitchen tucked in the corner received cosmetic updates during the renovation.
The kitchen features LG quartz countertops, appliances by KitchenAid, and molded plastic stools by Charles and Ray Eames from Design Within Reach.
In the kitchen, designer Polina Kopteva used Tikkurila N435 blue paint.
Dumas kept a relatively simple palette when it came to the interior. Floor-to-ceiling cabinetry in the kitchen acts as an effective noise barrier.
The new kitchen/dining room is entirely open and provides views of the garden.
The newly squared-off bay window now has a built-in bench. The teak cabinet pulls are custom. A Sub-Zero refrigerator is concealed behind teak panels, and a built-in coffee maker sits beside an inset counter.
The kitchen is outfitted with custom teak cabinetry and a black soapstone counter that extends up the backsplash and waterfalls to the floor. Dramatic built-in shelves accentuate the high ceilings.
Clay Anderson of Olson Kundig and Alex Almerico of NBBJ give their 505-square-foot home in Capitol Hill a serious upgrade on a strict budget. Adding built-in plywood bookshelves to the living room side of the kitchen island was a logical way to add storage and display space. Anderson also built a coffee table to match, using a remnant piece of blackened steel from his office, building a plywood box, and adding caster wheels. The pendant lights are simple matte black metal pipes that the couple ordered off Etsy from Greece. They also chose a Brizo matte black faucet to continue the "pipe look."
In an apartment of only about 350 square feet, Madrid–based architectural firm elii has designed a functional layout with a bright palette that emphasizes light and views to the streetscape outside. The light green cabinetry keeps the apartment feeling bright, while the wood gives texture and a natural feeling to the space.
The kitchen is at the heart of the home, and the layout is arranged so that the views can be appreciated when preparing a meal. Warm timber shelves and furniture contrast with the dark kitchen joinery to create a balanced interior palette.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.