Harbour Front-Row Seat

Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia
Location
  • Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia
  • Structure
  • House (Single Residence)
  • This project page was created by community member Luigi Rosselli Architects

    It is quite rare, in Woollahra Council’s municipality, to have a waterfront residence so close to the water. One gets the feeling of being in Sydney Harbour when looking out of the over-sized wafer-thin framed windows.

    Luigi Rosselli Architects won a limited architectural competition to develop the site by proposing to revive the existing three storey house while the competitors opted for a clean slate solution. Adaptive reuse is the best way to keep a carbon footprint small and the strategy was rewarded in this waterfront property by maintaining the foreshore building line just a few steps from the water. A new house would have to be set further back.

    Though built on the edge of beach this is not a beach house. The cultured art lovers and sophisticated art collectors who commissioned this project required a very urbane and elegant residence, with an environment ideal to display their collection. Expansive Wall spaces, nooks for sculptures and specialised art lighting were necessary.

    The entry courtyard was originally a cramped driveway with three garages as main features, the solution was to relocate the garages and have a Will Dangar designed courtyard with sculptural plants and textural architectural details. The result restored a sense of dignified arrival where people, not cars, are welcome.

    Design Architect: Luigi Rosselli
    Project Architects: Jane McNeill, Hugh Campbell

    Landscape Architect: William Dangar for Dangar Group / William Dangar Associates

    Structural & Hydraulic Consultant: Charles Blunt for Rooney & Bye (Australia) Pty Ltd

    Interior Designer: Alexandra Donohoe for Decus Interiors

    Builder: Sydcon Building Services Pty Ltd

    Joiner: Corelli Joinery

    Photography: Justin Alexander, Edward Birch

    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    A copper rimmed hole was cut into the flat roof to bring light and air to a deep terrace. The landscaper delivered, by crane, three frangipani trees to soften the sea wall. Brass boat portholes are cut into the gate and the boathouse doors.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The bead blasted stainless steel balcony railings are a nautical reference to the naval architecture of the 1930s. the low iron glass behind it is to satisfy the Building Code of Australia.
    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Sydney Harbour’s water continues in the white tiled swimming pool, a glass splash protection screen limits any pool water overflow onto the public beach.
    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The gravelled entry drive splits to the garage on the right and the entry court on the left. The timber wall cladding conceals a garage door and the old brick façade of the house.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Once a barren parking area, the entry courtyard is now a densely landscaped garden with bottle trees and garden gnomes.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The wall cladding is composed of three sizes of western red cedar panels with a Porter’s grey timber stain, specially mixed for the project.
    www.porterspaints.com

    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Steel windows and woven brass screens provide an open feeling and privacy as well.
    www.sky-frame.ch

    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The entrance hall is bathed in light from the stairwell both day and night.
    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    A timber handrail and masonry parapet follow the stair effortlessly, as if they had been formed with modelling clay.
    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The seven metre tall Lindsey Adelman chandelier dominates the stairwell. Light projectors, concealed in the suspended ceiling, illuminate the artwork.
    www.lindseyadelman.com

    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Four storeys high, the stair has a solid Blackbutt hardwood finish, with a moderate stain finish.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The vertical gallery of paintings terminates at the bottom of the stairs with a sculpture.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Nearly floating in Double Bay and Sydney Harbour, the living room is a collection of furniture classics, lighting icons and worldly artwork.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Brasilian ribbed glass in steel framed doors frame the jewellery inspired Herve van der Straeten lustre.
    www.vanderstraeten.fr

    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    1930s Halabala [ www.designaddict.com/atl... ] reading chairs contemplate the densely packed library.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    The horizontal gallery accessorised with painting suspension rails and flush ceiling light projectors.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    In the master bedroom, surrounded by a bronze finish brass mantelpiece, a discrete fireplace is a counterpoint to the frameless glass wall facing the Sydney Harbour.
    © Justin Alexander

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects

    Bay windows have expanded the existing house sideways, providing side viewing lines to Double Bay and Sydney Harbour
    © Edward Birch

    Photo Courtesy of Luigi Rosselli Architects
    Posted By
    Luigi Rosselli Architects
    @luigirosselli
    Australian based, this practice has a humanist approach to architecture and design, not eager to win awards, but always to instil good design and humane architecture that develops affinities, creating sympathetic buildings that flow and appeal. Working from the top floor of a converted Sydney warehouse, they are a team of architects and interior designers under the guidance of Luigi Rosselli and his three decades of international experience in Milano, Switzerland, New York and Sydney. Renowned for their houses, residential architecture, adaptive re-use and heritage designs, the studio has worked on a very wide range of projects: from offices to factories, from libraries to wineries, from childcare to chapels. Luigi Rosselli Architects is a carbon neutral practice applying sustainable building practises, as demonstrated by their expertise in rammed earth, air-conditioning-free spaces and energy efficiency. The humanist and environmental principles apparent in their projects has attracted a variety of clients, from the top achievers of Australian society to the penniless artist, with a variety of locations and briefs, resulting in a continual renewal of design solutions. Welcome to this showcase of their projects and please check back regularly as it will get better and better. # residential architecture # green # Sydney # rammed earth # contemporary # alterations and additions # adaptive re-use # award winning
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