Factor Residence

Los Angeles, California

The project for photographer and Smashbox founder, Davis Factor began as a series of site improvements around an existing single-story mid-century modern home near Mulholland Drive: a new carport, and a swimming pool, IPE wood deck & cabana in the rear yard with views of the San Fernando Valley below. The original 3,000 SF home, built in 1959, is of wood post & beam construction with frameless glass along the perimeter walls to take advantage of the valley views. Though preserving the same post & beam rhythm as the original house, the new carport and cabana were designed with exposed steel structural members. Additionally, a 500 SF gym was added to the master bedroom suite of the original house, with access to its own private outdoor patio area.

The expansion phase of the project began just as construction had started on the initial site improvements. The client, seizing the opportunity to purchase the lot next door, more than doubled the size of his property and set the tone of the design towards an estate-type setting. Now at 1.5 acres, the expanded lot could accomodate a proposed 2,700 SF guest house addition to the original home. The addition was also designed with exposed steel posts & beams, infilled with glass & large glass sliders along the Dzpublicdz side, and a solid privacy wall along the driveway, which is faced with a decorative aluminum mesh. A single exposed concrete structural wall bisects the guest house, acting as a datum between public and private spaces . . . spacious living room & bar on one side, master suite on the other.

Concurrent with the design of the guest house addition, a separate landscape plan was developed for the natural upslope part of the property, incorporating a railroad tie path that runs along almost the entire width of the property, coming down at points near the gym on one side & driveway on the other. The driveway itself, more of an elongated entry experience, is a combination of concrete pavers and permeable grasscrete, bounded on the sides by the guest house addition and various low landscape walls leading up to the carport. Sustainability: The proposed project has been organized and designed in such a way as to preserve the existing drainage patterns from site/private street to existing sheetflow patterns along Scadlock Lane. Catch basins tied to new subsurface storm drain lines are meant to provide an effective means of collecting water, while the general & relatively unchanged permeability of the site allows for continued natural recapture. Materials, to a large extent, have been selected such that they can be sourced or fabricated locally (from the wood & steel structure, concrete, stucco, drywall, sheet metal, millwork).

Sustainability:

The proposed project has been organized and designed in such a way as to preserve the existing drainage patterns from site/private street to existing sheetflow patterns along Scadlock Lane. Catch basins tied to new subsurface storm drain lines are meant to provide an effective means of collecting water, while the general & relatively unchanged permeability of the site allows for continued natural recapture. Materials, to a large extent, have been selected such that they can be sourced or fabricated locally (from the wood & steel structure, concrete, stucco, drywall, sheet metal, millwork).

Christopher L. Mercier (fer) studio uploaded Factor Residence through Add A Home.
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