Energy Neutral House

Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
Architect
  • Pieter Weijnen
Photographer
Location
  • Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
  • Structure
  • House (Single Residence)
  • Type
  • Modern
  • Year
  • 2009
  • Square Feet
  • 2500
  • This 2500 square foot Passivhaus was built using a penalized system. The architect Pieter Weijnen, of UPFRNT architects built it for his own use. It is unique in all of the sustainable, Cradle to Cradle and energy efficiency features, along with "new" innovative products used in the construction. Two of these new products include a phase-changing material (PCM) for accumulating heat on the exterior of the home, and aerogel insulation, a space-age, highly efficient insulation. Along with building the house with efficient insulation and triple pane windows, the house has a wind turbine, solar hot water panels and a groundwater heat exchanger. This house also includes adjustable screens, pellet stove biomass heater, radiant heating and much more. When a municipal tree had to be removed by one of the canals, Weijnen saved it and used it across the house to hold up the living room balcony. The Energy Neutral Residence was the first Passivhaus certified in Amsterdam. Since this house was built others have been certified. Photos courtesy of Hans Peter Föllmi. For more information about this house check "Preabulous World" by Sheri Koones (Abrams)

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    A technique was used for the wood front of the house called shou-sugi-ban, a traditional Japanese technique burning cypress wood to make it more sustainable. The wood is layered with bright orange planks. Solar collectors, which consist of double-glass tubes that minimize heat loss, form a cornice on the front facade of the house. A wind turbine is on the roof.  Photo  of Energy Neutral House modern home

    A technique was used for the wood front of the house called shou-sugi-ban, a traditional Japanese technique burning cypress wood to make it more sustainable. The wood is layered with bright orange planks. Solar collectors, which consist of double-glass tubes that minimize heat loss, form a cornice on the front facade of the house. A wind turbine is on the roof.

    The living room is located on the split-level second floor balcony, held up by the tree trunk and secure poles. The kitchen can be seen below.
 Photo 2 of Energy Neutral House modern home

    The living room is located on the split-level second floor balcony, held up by the tree trunk and secure poles. The kitchen can be seen below.

    The dining and kitchen area are located on the first floor. The ceramic tile floor is from a local source, which is Cradle to Cradle certified. Photo 3 of Energy Neutral House modern home

    The dining and kitchen area are located on the first floor. The ceramic tile floor is from a local source, which is Cradle to Cradle certified.

    A pergola is located at the rear of the house. This structure provides shade in the summer and lets sun into the house during the winter. Photo 4 of Energy Neutral House modern home

    A pergola is located at the rear of the house. This structure provides shade in the summer and lets sun into the house during the winter.

    The pellet stove, in the living room area,  serves multiple purposes, providing heat for the shower and heating rooms on very cold days. Photo 5 of Energy Neutral House modern home

    The pellet stove, in the living room area, serves multiple purposes, providing heat for the shower and heating rooms on very cold days.

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