Collection by Dwell

Dwell 20th Anniversary

In celebration of Dwell's 20 years of design coverage, we reflect on the brightest road markers in home design and beyond.

At Serenbe, an eco-friendly community outside Atlanta, New Urbanism planning principles were applied to create a live/work community that revolves around a variety of green spaces, including open fields, farmland, and forests.
At Serenbe, an eco-friendly community outside Atlanta, New Urbanism planning principles were applied to create a live/work community that revolves around a variety of green spaces, including open fields, farmland, and forests.
How Will Architecture Merge the Digital and Physical Worlds?: Artificial intelligence is not only changing how we design buildings—it’s also influencing how buildings shape our behavior.
How Will Architecture Merge the Digital and Physical Worlds?: Artificial intelligence is not only changing how we design buildings—it’s also influencing how buildings shape our behavior.
Over the past 10 years, the troubling realities of the food supply chain became apparent. The coronavirus pandemic has made them impossible to ignore.
Over the past 10 years, the troubling realities of the food supply chain became apparent. The coronavirus pandemic has made them impossible to ignore.
Montage of computer rendering of Ecohouse superimposed in a photograph of the actual project site in the Santa Monica Mountains, Los Angeles County, above Malibu.
Montage of computer rendering of Ecohouse superimposed in a photograph of the actual project site in the Santa Monica Mountains, Los Angeles County, above Malibu.
Studio 804's 1,500-square foot house supports the city of Lawrence's goals of increased downtown-adjacent residency.
Studio 804's 1,500-square foot house supports the city of Lawrence's goals of increased downtown-adjacent residency.
A living-dining space in a Common co-living apartment.
A living-dining space in a Common co-living apartment.
One of the main draws of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldmann’s house is its connection to the neighborhood, which is why the front porch was a must. “Homes that have a door but no outside space say, ‘I’m not interested in you,’” designer Christopher Robertson explains. “This says, ‘I’m here to be part of the community.’”
One of the main draws of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldmann’s house is its connection to the neighborhood, which is why the front porch was a must. “Homes that have a door but no outside space say, ‘I’m not interested in you,’” designer Christopher Robertson explains. “This says, ‘I’m here to be part of the community.’”
“The single biggest impact we have energy-wise is our buildings, not cars, and our clients get that,” says Frank Harmon. “I think there is general unease about how we treat the world, and people want [to] build in a sustainable ways.”
“The single biggest impact we have energy-wise is our buildings, not cars, and our clients get that,” says Frank Harmon. “I think there is general unease about how we treat the world, and people want [to] build in a sustainable ways.”
The Sarti house—like much of the furnishings inside—is neatly hidden amongst its more established counterparts. In the early evening, Sarti’s studio takes on a lanternlike appearance.
The Sarti house—like much of the furnishings inside—is neatly hidden amongst its more established counterparts. In the early evening, Sarti’s studio takes on a lanternlike appearance.
A note on our expert: Miriam Ponzi, whose father Tom Ponzi, was a famous private investigator, has always been on the cutting edge of technology. "I grew up playing with gadgets,
A note on our expert: Miriam Ponzi, whose father Tom Ponzi, was a famous private investigator, has always been on the cutting edge of technology. "I grew up playing with gadgets,
“People need to use green technology and green design every single day. It has to be more than politically correct, or even user-friendly; it has to be taken for granted,” writes Bruce Sterling in June 2001.
“People need to use green technology and green design every single day. It has to be more than politically correct, or even user-friendly; it has to be taken for granted,” writes Bruce Sterling in June 2001.
Robert Motherwell's New York City loft, 1962.
Robert Motherwell's New York City loft, 1962.
First published in the premier issue of Dwell Magazine (October 2000), “The Fruit Bowl Manifesto” articulates our vision of what great design should be.
First published in the premier issue of Dwell Magazine (October 2000), “The Fruit Bowl Manifesto” articulates our vision of what great design should be.