An Ad Copywriter Edits His Manhattan Row House—and Finds a New Calling

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By Paul Wong
Tom Givone reworked a rare 19th-century row house in upper Manhattan on his own, and found a new career along the way.

Back in 1998, Tom Givone was an advertising copywriter living in a tiny rent-controlled studio in New York’s West Village, dealing with a pain-in-the-neck landlord who was always trying to raise the rent. With the little bit of money he’d saved, he decided it was time to look for a place to buy. He ended up falling in love with a double row of 20 identical high-stooped wood houses, straight out of a Victorian fairy tale, on a cobblestone cul-de-sac called Sylvan Terrace. Located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of upper Manhattan, the houses—designed in 1882 by architect Gilbert Robinson Jr. to resemble an 18th-century mansion nearby—are anomalies in brick-and-concrete New York. 

Self-taught designer Tom Givone fixed up his 1882 row house in New York City over many years. In the parlor, he uncovered pocket doors entombed in sheetrock.

Self-taught designer Tom Givone fixed up his 1882 row house in New York City over many years. In the parlor, he uncovered pocket doors entombed in sheetrock.

All 20 row houses on Sylvan Terrace have matching yellow, brown, and green facades, as dictated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The architectural style was inspired by the nearby Morris-Jumel mansion, built in 1765. 

All 20 row houses on Sylvan Terrace have matching yellow, brown, and green facades, as dictated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The architectural style was inspired by the nearby Morris-Jumel mansion, built in 1765. 

When the house Tom wanted fell through, he was crushed, but he decided to just start knocking on every door on the street. "There were four or five houses for sale," he says. "Had I had any resources, I could have bought half the block."  

The parlor’s mixed-wood floor includes cherry with maple parquet. The Pol chair is by Mark Albrecht Studio.  

The parlor’s mixed-wood floor includes cherry with maple parquet. The Pol chair is by Mark Albrecht Studio.  

He finally found the perfect place—a 1,500-square-foot, three-story building that had recently been abandoned mid-renovation. "It had some electric and sheetrock," Tom says. "It was like a Home Depot shell that looked like an active job site—paint had hardened over and mud was on the walls." Tom bought the house, added a sink and an old stove to make it habitable, and started teaching himself how to patch it up. Every day after work, the homeowner-turned-contractor would begin a new project, ripping out sheetrock or uncovering 15-foot ceiling beams. Tom initially kept his day job in advertising, but by 2006 his career had morphed into something else: architectural design. 

The 12-foot kitchen island, topped in polished Carrara marble, has a waterfall edge and an integrated apron sink made from the same stone slab.

The 12-foot kitchen island, topped in polished Carrara marble, has a waterfall edge and an integrated apron sink made from the same stone slab.

The kitchen range hood is framed in wood, wrapped with cement board, and parged with a thin layer of polished concrete. The sides of the Carrara-topped island are clad in anodized aluminum, as are the IKEA cabinets. 

The kitchen range hood is framed in wood, wrapped with cement board, and parged with a thin layer of polished concrete. The sides of the Carrara-topped island are clad in anodized aluminum, as are the IKEA cabinets. 

He had begun taking on other people’s renovations—everything from a Brooklyn brownstone to a farmhouse in Sullivan County ("Hope Floats," May 2012)—while putting his own project on the back burner. His education was getting into these old structures and learning as he went. He spent his spare time sketching out lighting diagrams or picking out material samples. "I was the contractor, the designer, a one-man band," he says. And as the projects became more conceptually ambitious and structurally complex, he became something more of a conductor, bringing in architects, engineers, and craftspeople to help execute his designs.  

On the top floor, a Cumberland chair by Thos. Moser faces a Room & Board ottoman, a Twiggy lamp by Foscarini, and a vintage sofa upholstered in cowhide. 

On the top floor, a Cumberland chair by Thos. Moser faces a Room & Board ottoman, a Twiggy lamp by Foscarini, and a vintage sofa upholstered in cowhide. 

"It was like a Home Depot shell that looked like an active job site—paint had hardened over and mud was on the walls." Tom Givone, designer and resident 

Some floorboards and stair treads were salvaged from a farmhouse upstate.

Some floorboards and stair treads were salvaged from a farmhouse upstate.

Custom finishes in anodized aluminum meet original exposed ceiling beams and brick walls in the kitchen.

Custom finishes in anodized aluminum meet original exposed ceiling beams and brick walls in the kitchen.

Around 2015, he finally decided to turn his attention to completing his own house, which he’d lived in for almost 16 years. "I felt I had to get it done," he said. Plus, the timing was right. "I had a good crew, I was finding interesting materials, and I was learning different building applications."

A WH Design sofa and an Arper Catifa 80 chair rest on a Nanimarquina rug made <br>of recycled bike tires.&nbsp;

A WH Design sofa and an Arper Catifa 80 chair rest on a Nanimarquina rug made
of recycled bike tires. 

He restored the interiors by combing fairs like the Brimfield flea market in Massachusetts for furniture and lighting, but mostly by salvaging building supplies from neighbors. Everything from hardware to hinges to little pieces of original flooring was scooped out of local dumpsters. He even found treasure buried in his walls: a pair of eight-foot-tall wood doors hidden in the sheetrock of the parlor level.

Three fireplaces were rebuilt, including in the master bedroom. The flues were relined in stainless steel to make them operable.

Three fireplaces were rebuilt, including in the master bedroom. The flues were relined in stainless steel to make them operable.

Tom also did much of the work himself and spent countless hours researching ways to enhance the design—applying marine epoxy mixed with sawdust and paint between the floorboards like grout, then sanding them to a glass-smooth finish; teaming with specialists to re-create true plaster medallions for the ceilings in the parlor spaces; and applying anodized aluminum–faced plywood sheets—typically used as cladding in high-end commercial work—for kitchen doors, cabinets, and staircase and baseboard trim.

Tom bored a hole in a marble sink—formerly a water fountain basin at a park in Philadelphia—and added a Hudson Reed faucet&nbsp;

Tom bored a hole in a marble sink—formerly a water fountain basin at a park in Philadelphia—and added a Hudson Reed faucet 

Polished concrete floors and oversized quartz marble subway tiles outfit the second floor bathroom.

Polished concrete floors and oversized quartz marble subway tiles outfit the second floor bathroom.

Over the years, Tom has grown even more enchanted with his home and its charming architecture. But mostly he enjoys living in such an unusually quiet corner of Manhattan, on a street that time seems to have forgotten. "There is something powerful about this place, this block, and feeling this energy about this house that is very old and very new."

An Ad Copywriter Edits His Manhattan Row House—and Finds a New Calling - Photo 13 of 14 -



An Ad Copywriter Edits His Manhattan Row House—and Finds a New Calling - Photo 14 of 14 -