Ways to Conserve Water in Your Home

Presented by TOTO USA, Inc.
The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the average American family of four uses 400 gallons of water each day—which means it's time to investigate ways to reduce your home's water consumption. From the bathroom to the kitchen to the backyard, these seven water-wise systems will help limit your home's footprint.
<span style="line-height: 1.8;">Smart-flush toilets: Y</span>ou can save enormous amounts of water by buying the right appliances. In the bathroom, choose smart-flush toilet systems, like the Double-Cyclone mechanism employed in the TOTO Drake® II 1G Two-Piece Toilet, pictured. The system uses two nozzles to siphon water in a centrifugal, cyclonic motion, eliminating the need for multiple flushes.

Smart-flush toilets: You can save enormous amounts of water by buying the right appliances. In the bathroom, choose smart-flush toilet systems, like the Double-Cyclone mechanism employed in the TOTO Drake® II 1G Two-Piece Toilet, pictured. The system uses two nozzles to siphon water in a centrifugal, cyclonic motion, eliminating the need for multiple flushes.

Smart shower heads: &nbsp;In addition to the toilet, the shower is often a source of water loss in the bathroom. The Aero Rain Shower by TOTO, pictured, uses Aero-Jet technology, which infuses air into the water stream. This creates voluminous water droplets that contain less water than normal drops.

Smart shower heads:  In addition to the toilet, the shower is often a source of water loss in the bathroom. The Aero Rain Shower by TOTO, pictured, uses Aero-Jet technology, which infuses air into the water stream. This creates voluminous water droplets that contain less water than normal drops.

Harvest rainwater: If you're looking to make a big impact on your home's water consumption, consider a large-scale solution like rainwater harvesting. At this home in Carmel, California, the butterfly roof supports the collection of rainwater, which flows into hidden pumps at the notches of each roof that lead to concrete cisterns. During the summer, the cisterns passively release water into the meadow to irrigate the plants.

Harvest rainwater: If you're looking to make a big impact on your home's water consumption, consider a large-scale solution like rainwater harvesting. At this home in Carmel, California, the butterfly roof supports the collection of rainwater, which flows into hidden pumps at the notches of each roof that lead to concrete cisterns. During the summer, the cisterns passively release water into the meadow to irrigate the plants.

  

Greywater recycling:  Another option is greywater recycling, a process that filters and recycles water from toilets, sinks, showers, and other apliances for reuse in the home as water for toilet flushing, irrigation, and more.

Greywater recycling: Another option is greywater recycling, a process that filters and recycles water from toilets, sinks, showers, and other apliances for reuse in the home as water for toilet flushing, irrigation, and more.