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January 25, 2013
We enjoyed revisiting our archives to find some of our favorite examples of modern dining rooms. Some are tiny and some are fantastical, but all are rooms that we wouldn't mind breaking bread in. Take a look.
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  Piet Hein Eek's wooden chairs add a touch of color to the monochromatic Amsterdram apartment of Hunter Hindman and Shelby Carr. "I'm a fan of simple modern furniture, with a twist," says Carr. "I wanted to buy everything from Piet Hein Eek." Read the full article here.  Photo by Rene Mesman.   This originally appeared in Vertical Challenge.

    Piet Hein Eek's wooden chairs add a touch of color to the monochromatic Amsterdram apartment of Hunter Hindman and Shelby Carr. "I'm a fan of simple modern furniture, with a twist," says Carr. "I wanted to buy everything from Piet Hein Eek." Read the full article here.

    Photo by Rene Mesman.
    This originally appeared in Vertical Challenge.
  • 
  To inexpensively re-create a classic modern look for a wood-paneled ceiling in a Montara, California, dining room, architect Michael Maltzan used Douglas fir tongue-and-groove flooring. Read the full article here.  Courtesy of Noah Webb.

    To inexpensively re-create a classic modern look for a wood-paneled ceiling in a Montara, California, dining room, architect Michael Maltzan used Douglas fir tongue-and-groove flooring. Read the full article here.

    Courtesy of Noah Webb.
  • 
  Achitect Christopher Deam created a dining table from a fallen elm tree inside Jordan and Julie Harris's Belvedere, California, residence. Read the full article here.  Photo by Todd Hido.   This originally appeared in The Bellwether of Belvedere.

    Achitect Christopher Deam created a dining table from a fallen elm tree inside Jordan and Julie Harris's Belvedere, California, residence. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Todd Hido.
    This originally appeared in The Bellwether of Belvedere.
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  Originally constructed in 1970, the Wilson residence was updated by architects Sally and Ken Wilson in 2004.The living and dining rooms are outfitted with furniture from B&B Italia, Fritz Hansen, Modernica, and Knoll. Read the full article here.  Photo by Eric Laignel.   This originally appeared in Community of Vision.

    Originally constructed in 1970, the Wilson residence was updated by architects Sally and Ken Wilson in 2004.The living and dining rooms are outfitted with furniture from B&B Italia, Fritz Hansen, Modernica, and Knoll. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Eric Laignel.
    This originally appeared in Community of Vision.
  • 
  Inside a renovated nineteenth-century shophouse in Singapore, a dining table, made from a single piece of teak, is a little over 13 feet long and was custom made for the space. It can seat up to 24. Due to the building's narrow footprint, the architectural team chose to leave the roof completely open from the beginning of the original airshaft to the back of the house. Read the full article here.  Photo by Richard Powers.   This originally appeared in Straight and Narrow.

    Inside a renovated nineteenth-century shophouse in Singapore, a dining table, made from a single piece of teak, is a little over 13 feet long and was custom made for the space. It can seat up to 24. Due to the building's narrow footprint, the architectural team chose to leave the roof completely open from the beginning of the original airshaft to the back of the house. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Richard Powers.
    This originally appeared in Straight and Narrow.
  • 
  In keeping with architect David Langston-Jones’s love of Le Corbusier, he outfitted the dining room in his Sydney, Australia, residence with LC7 chairs and a LC6 table by the famed Swiss architect and designer Charlotte Perriand. Read the full article here.  Photo by Nick Bowers.   This originally appeared in Twice as Nice.

    In keeping with architect David Langston-Jones’s love of Le Corbusier, he outfitted the dining room in his Sydney, Australia, residence with LC7 chairs and a LC6 table by the famed Swiss architect and designer Charlotte Perriand. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Nick Bowers.
    This originally appeared in Twice as Nice.
  • 
  Cognizant of concrete’s excessive greenhouse gas emissions, architect Gregory Katz built his Norwood, South Africa, home with the future in mind: The modular structure could just as easily accommodate the demands of a nursery, restaurant, or office, as suggested by the various seating and dining arrangements situated throughout the house, particularly in the dining and living area. The space is outfitted with an Eames chair and an unfinished wood shelving unit and a dining table. Read the full article here.  Photo by Elsa Young.   This originally appeared in Katz's Cradle.

    Cognizant of concrete’s excessive greenhouse gas emissions, architect Gregory Katz built his Norwood, South Africa, home with the future in mind: The modular structure could just as easily accommodate the demands of a nursery, restaurant, or office, as suggested by the various seating and dining arrangements situated throughout the house, particularly in the dining and living area. The space is outfitted with an Eames chair and an unfinished wood shelving unit and a dining table. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Elsa Young.
    This originally appeared in Katz's Cradle.
  • 
  Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II, in Baltimore, Maryland, features three stark planes in the dining room: a wall of rock, a floor of bluestone, and a sheer slice of glass. Further adding to the unity of the house, the tubular steel dining chairs were also designed by Breuer. Read the full article here.  Photo by Zubin Shroff.   This originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II.

    Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II, in Baltimore, Maryland, features three stark planes in the dining room: a wall of rock, a floor of bluestone, and a sheer slice of glass. Further adding to the unity of the house, the tubular steel dining chairs were also designed by Breuer. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Zubin Shroff.
    This originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II.
  • 
  JeanClaude LeBlanc worked with architect Peter Cardew to update his 1960s split-level in Vancouver, British Columbia. He sits at the western maple dining room table, which was designed by Cardew. Read the full article here.  Photo by João Canziani.   This originally appeared in On the Level.

    JeanClaude LeBlanc worked with architect Peter Cardew to update his 1960s split-level in Vancouver, British Columbia. He sits at the western maple dining room table, which was designed by Cardew. Read the full article here.

    Photo by João Canziani.
    This originally appeared in On the Level.
  • 
  On Shoal Lake, which straddles the borders of Manitoba and Ontario, Herbert Enns hand-built a series of pavilions that would serve as an inexpensive family compound. In the dining and cooking pavilion, some creature comforts, like Karim Rashid Oh chairs, a stove, and a dining table made of a felled tree propped on sawhorses, do exist. Read the full article here.  Photo by Thomas Fricke. Courtesy of � Thomas Fricke/Corbis.  This originally appeared in Barely There.

    On Shoal Lake, which straddles the borders of Manitoba and Ontario, Herbert Enns hand-built a series of pavilions that would serve as an inexpensive family compound. In the dining and cooking pavilion, some creature comforts, like Karim Rashid Oh chairs, a stove, and a dining table made of a felled tree propped on sawhorses, do exist. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Thomas Fricke. Courtesy of � Thomas Fricke/Corbis.
    This originally appeared in Barely There.
  • 
  Husband and wife architecture team Takaharu and Yui Tezuka created a family-style house in Tokyo, Japan, using traditional building materials. A sliding pocket wall opens to reveal the dining area's Series 7 chairs by Arne Jacobsen. The kid's chair is a Tripp Trapp by Stokke. Read the full article here.  Photo by Adam Friedberg.   This originally appeared in Family Style.

    Husband and wife architecture team Takaharu and Yui Tezuka created a family-style house in Tokyo, Japan, using traditional building materials. A sliding pocket wall opens to reveal the dining area's Series 7 chairs by Arne Jacobsen. The kid's chair is a Tripp Trapp by Stokke. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Adam Friedberg.
    This originally appeared in Family Style.
  • 
  Barbara Hill's 850-square-foot condominium in Houston, Texas, features a French farm table surrounded by a sextet of black and white Harry Bertoia chairs for Knoll. Read the full article here.  Photo by Dean Kaufman.   This originally appeared in Stripped Ease.

    Barbara Hill's 850-square-foot condominium in Houston, Texas, features a French farm table surrounded by a sextet of black and white Harry Bertoia chairs for Knoll. Read the full article here.

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
    This originally appeared in Stripped Ease.
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Piet Hein Eek's wooden chairs add a touch of color to the monochromatic apartment. "I'm a fan of simple modern furniture, with a twist," says Carr. "I wanted to buy everything from Piet Hein Eek."

Piet Hein Eek's wooden chairs add a touch of color to the monochromatic Amsterdram apartment of Hunter Hindman and Shelby Carr. "I'm a fan of simple modern furniture, with a twist," says Carr. "I wanted to buy everything from Piet Hein Eek." Read the full article here.

Photo by Rene Mesman.

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