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Visionary Architect Focus: Paolo Soleri

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Countercultural architect Paolo Soleri looked beyond the bounds of four walls and a roof to orchestrate his vision for comprehensive ecological design.
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  Architect Paolo Soleri envisioned Arcosanti as a structure for 5,000 people. Construction began in 1970 but stalled before it could be completed. However, it continues to be a cultural hub in Arizona. Daily meetings take place in an area known as the Vaults, which functions akin to an ancient Roman forum. There, people discuss events, sell produce, and make announcements.Photo by: Peter Bohler

    Architect Paolo Soleri envisioned Arcosanti as a structure for 5,000 people. Construction began in 1970 but stalled before it could be completed. However, it continues to be a cultural hub in Arizona. Daily meetings take place in an area known as the Vaults, which functions akin to an ancient Roman forum. There, people discuss events, sell produce, and make announcements.

    Photo by: Peter Bohler

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  A handful of operations staff live in on-site apartments. Rather than dig out a boulder that’s part of the mesa Arcosanti rests upon, builders incorporated it into the room. Woodworker Tim Daulton constructed the staircase.Photo by: Peter Bohler

    A handful of operations staff live in on-site apartments. Rather than dig out a boulder that’s part of the mesa Arcosanti rests upon, builders incorporated it into the room. Woodworker Tim Daulton constructed the staircase.

    Photo by: Peter Bohler

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  Arcosanti is also home to a small number of artists and people passing through. Halley Anderson worked at Arcosanti in 2012 and does a handstand in the Sky Suite, one of the rooms available for rent.Photo by: Peter Bohler

    Arcosanti is also home to a small number of artists and people passing through. Halley Anderson worked at Arcosanti in 2012 and does a handstand in the Sky Suite, one of the rooms available for rent.

    Photo by: Peter Bohler

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  Most of Soleri’s arcologies— conceptual hybrids between architecture and ecology—were never built, including Novanoah II Arcology, published in his seminal 1969 tome Arcology: The City in the Image of Man.Images courtesy Arcosanti.

    Most of Soleri’s arcologies— conceptual hybrids between architecture and ecology—were never built, including Novanoah II Arcology, published in his seminal 1969 tome Arcology: The City in the Image of Man.

    Images courtesy Arcosanti.

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  The ribbon-like Lean Linear City: Arterial Ecology. Images courtesy Arcosanti.

    The ribbon-like Lean Linear City: Arterial Ecology. 

    Images courtesy Arcosanti.

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  His masterwork was Arcosanti, still vital over 40 years after construction began.Images courtesy Arcosanti.

    His masterwork was Arcosanti, still vital over 40 years after construction began.

    Images courtesy Arcosanti.

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