6 Clever Structures People Call Home

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February 11, 2013
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  Setsumasa and Mami Kobayashi’s weekend retreat, two and a half hours northwest of Tokyo, is what a modern back-to-the-land effort looks like. One North Face tent sits atop a deck; another caps the main building, which contains a kitchen and dining area. Take a look at more of this tent structure here.  Photo by Dean Kaufman.   This originally appeared in A Platform for Living.

    Setsumasa and Mami Kobayashi’s weekend retreat, two and a half hours northwest of Tokyo, is what a modern back-to-the-land effort looks like. One North Face tent sits atop a deck; another caps the main building, which contains a kitchen and dining area. Take a look at more of this tent structure here.

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
    This originally appeared in A Platform for Living.
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  Andreas Stavropoulos chose a light material palette with a few splashes of color for the 1959 Airstream travel trailer he calls home. The lightness holds the space open and gives it a contemporary feel. See more of this renovated trailer here.  Photo by Mark Compton.   This originally appeared in The Airstream Life.

    Andreas Stavropoulos chose a light material palette with a few splashes of color for the 1959 Airstream travel trailer he calls home. The lightness holds the space open and gives it a contemporary feel. See more of this renovated trailer here.

    Photo by Mark Compton.
    This originally appeared in The Airstream Life.
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  Connie DeWitt and Kam Kasravi chose to build their Santa Cruz, CA home out of shipping containers as a homage to the old South Pacific Railroad Line, which is near the home’s site. “In a way, they are the modern great-granddaughters of the trains that used to pass by here: metal boxes used for transportation,” muses DeWitt. See the interior of this home here.    This originally appeared in Railroad Revival.

    Connie DeWitt and Kam Kasravi chose to build their Santa Cruz, CA home out of shipping containers as a homage to the old South Pacific Railroad Line, which is near the home’s site. “In a way, they are the modern great-granddaughters of the trains that used to pass by here: metal boxes used for transportation,” muses DeWitt. See the interior of this home here.

    This originally appeared in Railroad Revival.
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  Communal living has never looked better than on this Dutch property. x Take a look at the rest of the Creative Commons collective here.  Photo by Dean Kaufman.   This originally appeared in Modern Communal Living in the Netherlands.

    Communal living has never looked better than on this Dutch property. x Take a look at the rest of the Creative Commons collective here.

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
    This originally appeared in Modern Communal Living in the Netherlands.
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  This home’s metal cladding is Pac-Clad, a material typically used for roofs. See more of this Pac-Clad home here.  Photo by David Robert Elliot.   This originally appeared in Come Sail Away.

    This home’s metal cladding is Pac-Clad, a material typically used for roofs. See more of this Pac-Clad home here.

    Photo by David Robert Elliot.
    This originally appeared in Come Sail Away.
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  Jeff Walz gazes over the railing from the front stoop of his recycled steel-and-glass home, which replaced the quaint-but-decrepit 140-year-oldfarmhouse in which he’d originally planned to reside. View the rest of this Pittsburgh steeler here.  Photo by Livia Corona.   This originally appeared in Pittsburgh Steeler.

    Jeff Walz gazes over the railing from the front stoop of his recycled steel-and-glass home, which replaced the quaint-but-decrepit 140-year-oldfarmhouse in which he’d originally planned to reside. View the rest of this Pittsburgh steeler here.

    Photo by Livia Corona.
    This originally appeared in Pittsburgh Steeler.
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