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Decked Out

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It's our humble opinion that summers are best spent reclining on a warm sunny deck with a refreshing beverage in hand and a cool breeze blowing. In honor of this seasonal ritual, here are seven homes that managed to carve out a bit of outdoor space, whether they're sandwiched within the narrow streets of a historic Mediterranean city, built at the confluence of forested and rocky topographies in Norway, or sited beachside in Amagansett, New York.

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  "I think an architect’s job is to celebrate what people really care about and simplify and streamline the rest,” says Page Goolrick, the architect tasked with renovating a distressed beach house in Amagansett, New York. Using the design of boats as a muse, she created a storage-smart and comfortable vacation retreat. The chaise, deck chairs, and table are by Richard Schultz.
    "I think an architect’s job is to celebrate what people really care about and simplify and streamline the rest,” says Page Goolrick, the architect tasked with renovating a distressed beach house in Amagansett, New York. Using the design of boats as a muse, she created a storage-smart and comfortable vacation retreat. The chaise, deck chairs, and table are by Richard Schultz.
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  The bright orange frame of the glazed door adds a sense of modern exuberance to the deck of Francesco Moncada and Mafalda Rangel's house in Sicily. The sunny, open space reveals both a Loop chair by Willy Guhl and the tile rooftops of Syracuse, where the water is never far off.
    The bright orange frame of the glazed door adds a sense of modern exuberance to the deck of Francesco Moncada and Mafalda Rangel's house in Sicily. The sunny, open space reveals both a Loop chair by Willy Guhl and the tile rooftops of Syracuse, where the water is never far off.
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  Blocked from the wind, a deck at the rear of the house is a favorite place for sunbathing and also shelters planters of herbs. "Norwegian summers are short, and it’s customary to spend as much time outdoors as possible. Because of the exposure here we wanted to make sure that no matter how the wind blew, there would be shelter," says Jürgen Kiehl. His vacation home in Hanko, Norway, was inspired by Sea Ranch in California and the work of Louis Kahn. "We also wanted sunlight through the course of the day. So for every indoor space there is a corresponding outdoor space—a deck, a sheltered area, a balcony."
    Blocked from the wind, a deck at the rear of the house is a favorite place for sunbathing and also shelters planters of herbs. "Norwegian summers are short, and it’s customary to spend as much time outdoors as possible. Because of the exposure here we wanted to make sure that no matter how the wind blew, there would be shelter," says Jürgen Kiehl. His vacation home in Hanko, Norway, was inspired by Sea Ranch in California and the work of Louis Kahn. "We also wanted sunlight through the course of the day. So for every indoor space there is a corresponding outdoor space—a deck, a sheltered area, a balcony."
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  The interior of this modern Toronto house unfolds like a magic trick, with a 30-foot-wide main floor that opens onto a broad, sunlit courtyard. The residents, two architects, traveled the world after college and found some common architectural passions—especially in the buildings of Spain, Mexico, and the Indian province of Rajasthan. “The places we liked had courtyards,” says Ho Ping Kong, “spaces where the light comes from above.” A long wall of cedar-framed windows opens onto the main courtyard, and the setting sun washes in from both sides to paint the patio stones and a single Japanese maple with the last drops of daylight.
    The interior of this modern Toronto house unfolds like a magic trick, with a 30-foot-wide main floor that opens onto a broad, sunlit courtyard. The residents, two architects, traveled the world after college and found some common architectural passions—especially in the buildings of Spain, Mexico, and the Indian province of Rajasthan. “The places we liked had courtyards,” says Ho Ping Kong, “spaces where the light comes from above.” A long wall of cedar-framed windows opens onto the main courtyard, and the setting sun washes in from both sides to paint the patio stones and a single Japanese maple with the last drops of daylight.
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  Gatherings at Laura Gabbert and Andrew Avery's Los Angeles residence tend toward the casual, with kid-friendly hangouts on the back patio. Sliding doors on either side of the living room and along the kitchen open all the way, allowing the breeze from the canyon to spin right through the house. The patio furniture is from Room and Board.
    Gatherings at Laura Gabbert and Andrew Avery's Los Angeles residence tend toward the casual, with kid-friendly hangouts on the back patio. Sliding doors on either side of the living room and along the kitchen open all the way, allowing the breeze from the canyon to spin right through the house. The patio furniture is from Room and Board.
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  A sliding glass NanaWall leads to the deck of this sun-drenched San Diego abode by Sebastian Mariscal Studio.
    A sliding glass NanaWall leads to the deck of this sun-drenched San Diego abode by Sebastian Mariscal Studio.
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  To reduce heat load and provide shade on Nancy Church's modern home in Michigan City, Indiana, architect John DeSalvo initially tracked down a sail system from Sun Shade Australia. But the $6,000 price tag had the architect and contractor designing their own version out of Mermet solar screen fabric. It was fabricated by Covers Unlimited for $1,800.
    To reduce heat load and provide shade on Nancy Church's modern home in Michigan City, Indiana, architect John DeSalvo initially tracked down a sail system from Sun Shade Australia. But the $6,000 price tag had the architect and contractor designing their own version out of Mermet solar screen fabric. It was fabricated by Covers Unlimited for $1,800.

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