8135 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.

The gated mid-century estate combines stately scale with original features and era-sensitive updates, making it a Los Angeles mid-century marvel.
The family shares an alfresco lunch with Ikimau Ikimau, a friendly neighbor who helped build the house. The aluminum weatherboard cladding was custom-designed by O’Sullivan.
In the kids’ room, Seamus climbs the bunk beds he shares with his siblings.
Four-year-old Seamus relaxes in the living room, whose plywood walls 

are covered with family photographs.
Outside on the deck, one-year-old Mary and three-year-old Finbar enjoy a snack at the kid-size table and chairs Michael designed and made for them.
Melissa Schollum stands at the brass island bench in the kitchen. O’Sullivan, who designed and built the house, spent many hours creating the wooden joinery (including the tall, slender windows and their timber shutters) and the intricate ceiling. The cupboards under the marble bench in the kitchen are made of glass to allow more light into the space. The dining table and chairs were designed by Sam Haughton of IMO.
the reflectivity of the brass kitchen island makes it seem to dematerialize.
In the suburb on the mountain’s lower slopes, Michael O’Sullivan and his sons Seamus and Finbar exchange motorcycle tips outside the compact, innovative home O’Sullivan designed.
White walls, a luxurious marble double-sink, and an area rug give this bathroom an inviting atmosphere. “The natural light, open spaces, and light color palette make it a great place to wake up in the morning,” Flournoy says of his home. The sink is from Restoration Hardware and the rug is from West Elm.
Stair to third floor family room
Small punched window brings morning light into second and third floors along stairwell
Family room at third level.  Laundry concealed behind panels at left
Rear portico framing rear access to house
Detail at bedside with window nook
New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
Kitchen and dining area from point of entry with coffee and drink service beyond
Living room opening out onto rear garden
Dining area and kitchen beyond.  Service pods on the left create distinction between areas along the open plan
Kitchen with custom floating tiled hood vent
Powder room with borrowed light from glass ceiling over hung wall sink
Black slate hearth with wood stove.  Millwork pod conceals entertainment area when not in use
Dining and staircase to second floor
Master bedroom with ensuite beyond
Master ensuite with sliding mirror panels and view to green roof at tub
Bathroom with borrowed light and view across a double height volume
In the guest bathroom, Givone installed a hand-chiseled sink made of 17th-century marble quarried from the hills outside of Rome.
A gas fireplace fronted in weathered steel warms 

up the lofty master bedroom, whose spare decor is framed with beams discovered in a Pennsylvania barn. The Tizio desk lamp is by Artemide.
The Floating Farmhouse’s semitransparent addition has a roofline that matches the pitch of the original 1820s farmhouse. A porch, tucked under the side eaves, is cantilevered over a stream that runs through the property. Ikea loungers are illuminated from the interior by commercial gymnasium lights repurposed as pendant lamps.
The table is situated in front of the house’s rear wall of skyscraper glass. Laminate kitchen cabinets by Ikea are framed in wraparound bluestone; the 48-inch commercial range is by FiveStar.
A salvaged 19th-century soaking tub wrapped 

in stainless steel is topped by Hudson Reed faucets.
“The hope has been to combine archaic and modern elements in a way that would enhance the beauty of each by virtue of its contrast with the other.” —Tom Givone
In the kitchen of Floating Farmhouse in Eldred, New York, a custom-built wood-fired oven extends up to the ceiling, accentuating its steep pitch. Photo by Mark Mahaney.
Tom Givone sits at a table of his own design, which 

he had fabricated from reclaimed wood by a local carpenter.
As in the kitchen, the bathroom features custom wooden cabinetry and Brodware faucets.
The custom kitchen cabinets sit on legs for easy sweeping underneath. They’re topped with white Corian counters and paired with sleek Brodware fixtures.
The clients had an impressive collection of Scandinavian midcentury teak furniture that now pops beautifully against the concrete floors, white-painted brick, and pine v-joint walls.
For the the living room, the architects designed a cluster of picture windows that frame unique views—a jacaranda tree or a patch of sky—and block out neighbors from a nearby apartment building.
“It’s a great house for a young family—playful, practical and different,” Tribe says. “You can sit on the windowsill in the sun and feed the baby, kids can climb in and out, often through the windows, and you can see everything that is going on.”
With its open-joisted, gabled ceiling, the upstairs bedroom is cozy but bright. Bedside tables from Kartell and Tizio Lamps from Artemide flank the bed, while a midcentury credenza, purchased at Old Soul Antiques sits beneath the window.
In the dining area, Danish modern chairs purchased at Circa Modern are tucked into a wood table from Restoration Hardware. The kitchen cabinets, counters and sink are from Ikea with faucets from Danze. The backsplash tiles are from Heath Ceramics.
Most of the home’s furniture was purchased at Restoration Hardware, Circa Modern, or antique shops. “We both love the midcentury designs that we grew up with,” Bronee says. “We wanted furniture that was authentic to us and our personal styles while also fitting into a Catskills hideaway barn.”
The house captures meadow views, thanks to three large sliding doors by Loewen that lead out to a big deck. “We wanted to hide the view from visitors until you get inside, so it would feel like a surprise when walking in,” Bronee says. “This also gives us the sense of being tucked in and cozy in the winter with a view of the meadow, and in the summer it feels like indoors and outdoors are connected. We live just as much on the deck as we do inside.”
In Scandinavian regions, traditional cabins are painted black using a mixture of tar and linseed oil. Peck reproduced the look using corrugated metal—a lower-maintenance, more sustainable material. “We love that it is black, because it really reminds us of home,” Bronee says. The house has no windows on its front side, belying its light-flooded interior.
The cabin’s basic structure was reclaimed from a barn built in 1840 and purchased from Heritage Barns out of Waco, Texas. The same company supplied the recycled wood that clads the walls, though the ceiling boards are new. “We stained them with a gray wash to match the tones of the post and beam, but with a more clean look,” Bronee explains. The concrete floors were polished and waxed for a sleek finish.
Mobile Nap

Turner made much of the barn’s furniture from OSB, but the mobile daybed 

on wheels is a standout piece and allows the user to catch the sun or shade as the mood strikes.
Color and material cues help Matthew navigate the house. Reclaimed wood from a local barn marks the dining room, which also features a table from BoConcept, a Graypants pendant lamp, and molded-fiberglass chairs by Charles and Ray Eames. In the living room, the color palette of the Design Within Reach sofa and built-in bookshelves was inspired by maple trees in fall. “That’s really what universal design is about: making it as stylish as anything you’d put in anyone else’s house, but having the ability for it to be accessible,” says Coplen.

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