9053 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.

A vintage wood lamp and turned bowl stands next to the bed. "We wanted to incorporate elements used in residential homes," Hollis says of the eclectic medley of accessories and furnishings in the space. "These would be items that you would collect over time. They don't exactly match, but they all work together—they create a relaxed casual environment while still elevating the interior and amenities to what you expect from a world-class luxury property."
The entrance features marble floors and a grand staircase. The home was built with sturdy 2x6 construction and features plastered walls throughout.
Rearyard Extension
Hand-Troweled Concrete Bathroom
Exposed Joists in the Bedroom
Old Fireplace Recreated into a Bookshelf
Living Room with Art Wall
Living Room
Kitchen
Interior designer Andrea Larsson Sanchez complements the polished concrete floor, original Crittall windows, and exposed brick with contemporary furnishings and graphic textiles.
Located in the 1,200-year-old historic center of Kyoto, Japan, and surrounded by green hills, Nichinichi Townhouse is a holiday home that combines traditional Japanese environments with modern aesthetics. 
The townhouse sits adjacent to the Nichinichi Art Gallery, a showcase of fine crafts and Japanese culture managed by Elmar, the gallery's owner. It is the ideal holiday home for travelers who want to immerse themselves in the local customs and unique elegance of Kyoto.
With its organic, horizontal silhouette, raw concrete facade, and Bauhaus-leaning interiors, this midcentury nature retreat brings modernity to the mountains. 
Set high in a coastal mountain range in Topanga, California, is Saddle Peak—a two-level, four-bedroom holiday rental house with sublime geometry and defined lines.
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
Architect Cindy Black chose terrazzo tile flooring by Concrete Collaborative over higher-priced competitors because it’s a “little more polished looking”. Before installing the material, the builder had to completely re-level the concrete subfloor, which had settled over time leaving a two-inch gap on one side. The sofa is from Room & Board, and the custom walnut media wall was designed to match the kitchen built-ins.
Builder Jason Miars fabricated the walnut-paneled walls and kitchen cabinetry, which is accented by stainless-steel Linnea drawer pulls.
“Life happens around architecture. And that’s fine: A lot of houses get more beautiful when they age.” 

—Architect Rick Black
The cooktop, refrigerator, and wall ovens are by Jenn-Air; the sink and faucet are by Kohler; and the countertops are from Caesarstone.
The architects designed the bed and nightstands themselves and picked up the lamps from Target. "We've found that you can mix design and commodity stuff well if you're attentive to the overall presentation," says Schatz.
These 3107 chairs and Superellipse table are from Fritz Hansen.
A ladder leads up to the bedroom, which is tucked under the curve of the vaulted roof. The Sunburst clock is by George Nelson; the flat-screen TV is by Philips.
Schatz and Eamon carefully tend to the greens planted on the ground that they took to with shovels when digging the original footings for their home.
A carefully placed window illuminates the corner of the main living area.
Regina and Andy Rihn open the sliding doors in the main living space when they need more ventilation, while the two dogs prefer to use their custom door to get a little fresh air.
The platform bed in the master bedroom was crafted by a local woodworker.
Plywood lines the stair walls.
A tiny spare room off the studio doubles as guest bedroom and extra floor and wall space for the plethora of art.
The sitting room.
The catwalk running above the studio is aptly named for the  household: Farley’s felines patrol their owners’ activity from this overhead perch.
At night, the entire studio glows like a lantern, its light amplified by the reflection in the seasonal pond. I
A continuous concrete slab runs from inside the house out to the open deck, which is exposed to the wind that sweeps the surrounding fields.
The front entrance of the Farley Studio presents a clean, minimalist space—a stark contrast to the colorful clutter of the painting studio hidden behind corrugated-metal walls at the back of the house.
Indoor and outdoor entertaining is made simple by the dining room’s sliding glass doors, but the two spaces also share a literal common ground. Lapicida’s tumbled black limestone with white Carrara marble inserts sprawl from the kitchen, past the dining room, and onto the patio.
“We did a lot of studies for the project to show how we could get huge amounts of light into the rear of the house,” Roberts said, which culminates in the two-story addition that replaced the original collapsing wall. The living room’s two antique round leather chairs, by Ralph Lauren, are within view of the garden beyond matching sets of windows.
A salvaged antique tub stands beside a sink by Waterworks. Town and Country Surfaces supplied the Malaga cement tiles that color the floor.
As much as the owners and Roberts wanted – and needed – to modernize the home, they also tried to honor some of its historical touches. They preserved the mantel, and replaced the plaster crowns on the parlor level. The antique chaise is by Lisa Sherman, and the walls are painted pavilion gray by Farrow & Ball.
“They knew they wanted a big kitchen where all of their friends could stand around and be involved in the cooking process,” Roberts said of the owners. Exposed beams stripe a ceiling above Wood Mode cabinets painted Newport Green by Benjamin Moore.
The original home’s dilapidated rear wall was in such poor condition that Roberts called it “an opportunity in disguise.” She removed the wall and built a two-story addition that features double-glazed windows and sliding doors for unified entertaining inside and in the garden.
Taking a closer look at the core of the wave, you’ll find a relaxing hub for the teens to rest after a day of skating or surfing. To soften the factory-like atmosphere, track lighting with subtle LEDs were installed to create a more ambient tone—the final step in forging the perfect chill out zone.
A custom board rack provides a space for showing off prized decks.
A movie-watching paradise with a curved timber “wave” cascades from the ceiling to the floor.
The bar was built to complement the skate bowl with a design that would work in tandem with it. A black Smeg refrigerator and surfboard rack are just a few inclusions that contribute to the overall industrialized look. Going a step further, a 4.5-meter-long timber bar created from ground and polished concrete was designed to match the flooring seamlessly.
A fully functional concrete skate bowl plays a quintessential role in the layout and movement of the space. With walls lined with custom art by South African street artist Jack Fox, the playful quality of the space is achieved.
By leaving the exterior walls of the neighboring structures exposed on their interior, Miro and Weiss guaranteed that the neighborhood’s history would be a part of their new home. Raw plywood and industrial-strength steel railings are balanced with custom finishes and signs of domesticity.
Even the family dogs have a comfortable resting spot just off the kitchen and dining room on the second floor of the house.
Darcy Miro and her son, Lucien, enjoy a moment in their new double-height living room. The Charlotte Perriand wall sconces are vintage finds.

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