9466 Home Design Ideas and Photos

Henry and Emily share a bedroom and a bunkbed made by Ducduc, an American furniture company. Thanks to panel doors that slide into the walls, the bedrooms balance privacy with openness to the rest of the house. With a guestroom and trundle beds in the kids’ rooms, the 1,357-square-foot house can easily sleep four adults and five children—more if people crash on the couches.
Mary Jo Davis, Marja Preston, Jonathan Davis, and Tia Preston gather on the deck. “The community is the biggest selling point,” Preston says. “The icing on the cake is sustainability.”
In the living room, a warm woodsy palette reigns, with a few blue-gray notes to create a serene mood.
Chris and Wendy Kozina live with their son, Ben, in a “Tallis” style town house. They selected bamboo floors for the 1,155-square-foot, two-bedroom interior. The family strives to cap their possessions at 500 items—Legos not included. In the living room, an Innes media cabinet from Room & Board is paired with a Gus Modern sectional.
Each “micro-hood” consists of six to eight houses around common outdoor spaces. Davis was careful to design for privacy: Large windows face south and small ones point north to avoid big expanses of facing glass.
Rooftop Itek solar panels power the community—and are eligible for increased production incentives because they’re made locally. Although the panels were optional, every Village resident chose  to install them.
Phase one consists of 23 houses and two apartment buildings with 10 units each. The next two phases, The Grove and The Park, will offer a mix of town houses and condominium apartments. Some critics see these more conventional schemes as diluted versions of the original concept.
The Village features gardens and orchards created by Tim Goss, Kia Micaud, and HomeGrown Organics. No roads run within the community, so it’s completely car-free (a parking lot sits at the far end of the site). An abundance of bicycles has meant a shortage of bike parking, an element of the plan the Grow team acknowledges they could have done differently.
Eight-year-old Emily peeks out from a sliding panel door with matte marine hardware that will age gracefully in the salty air.
Davis used the same material to build furniture, including beds for his master bedroom.
Houses in The Village feature Marvin windows and doors, energy-efficient GE and Frigidaire appliances, Mitsubishi heat pumps, and Zehnder HRV systems. Each buyer was able to customize the interior finish package of their house from options that met the community’s sustainability guidelines. One area in which residents’ tastes differed was flooring; the Davis family chose cork. In place of closets, the houses have built-in storage made of Douglas fir plywood.
"I think an architect’s job is to celebrate what people really care about and simplify and streamline the rest.” —Page Goolrick
The color of the Fishers’ front door was inspired by an old Land Rover Defender’s hue, which Charlie had Benjamin Moore custom-match.
Clad in a mix of stained cedar, Metal Sales corrugated siding, and James Hardie cement board, houses in The Village are arranged along winding paths intended to provide opportunities for neighbors to interact.
With 142 residences on just eight acres, the Grow Community development brings new density to Bainbridge Island, near Seattle. Architect Jonathan Davis, in the garden with his daughter, Dashwood,designed the project’s first phase, The Village. Inspired by One Planet Living sustainability principles, it was imagined as an assemblage of net-zero homes.
Sheer curtains let light and breezes into the master bedroom.
Ten-year-old Henry cuddles with three-year-old Grace.
A Mirror Ball pendant by Tom Dixon hovers over the kitchen counter.
In addition to being a launchpad for rising talent, Bezar will feature wares from more recognizable brands, such as Tom Dixon. Part of their tableware collection, the TANK decanter is made of hand-blown glass and accented with gold paint.
Of the facade, Maury says, “It doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb, but it’s definitely one of the cooler houses in our area.”
A 1953 modern home by Curtis and Davis in New Orleans’s Lakeshore neighborhood proved too tempting to pass up for veteran renovators Maury Strong, a film producer with an A-list client roster, and Ron Caron,  a public school teacher. But the couple soon discovered that the flood-damaged structure with multiple sloppy renovations was  a bigger challenge than they had imagined. With the help of a team led by Wayne Troyer and Natan Diacon-Furtado of studioWTA and the original architectural plans, they created a modern oasis to last a lifetime.
Appleply Cabinets: Conner Millworks created the custom casework throughout the house. Although the residents initially considered solid hardwood, ApplePly composite with a walnut veneer proved to be a more sustainable alternative. The material, which is sealed with a matte-finish conversion varnish, appears in the kitchen, the bar area, and even the master and guest bathrooms.
Plantings: Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture, contractor Sandra Tomasetti, and architecture firm studioWTA collaborated to develop  a roofline without gutters above the walkway and carport. Instead, water is channeled to feed the garden. The result is a California-inspired yard with geometrically laid-out plantings rather than grass. “It’s rows of green with mulch permeating,” Maury says.
In the master bathroom, a BainUltra Essencia freestanding tub with an Axor Starck filler offers a perch for the couple’s granddaughter Arabella and her cousin Alexandra. The built-in vanity is made of the same ApplePly material as the kitchen cabinetry.
Tom Dixon’s Copper Shade pendant lamps reflect his background in metalwork.
A collection of Dixon's new gold pendants hangs in the Bar Club.
Copper Shade Pendants by Tom Dixon over the island contrast the room's light palette, while a white Flos Skygarden lamp over the dining room table blends into it.
A Leda lamp from David Weeks Studio graces a table.
Goneau matched Audrey Chairs from Kartell with a dining table she designed herself. “It becomes the visual continuity of the kitchen island, by its dimensions and material,” she says. A bronze copper pendant by Tom Dixon hangs above it.
Cooper, 11,  paddleboards toward an outbuilding that contains a sauna.
In the kitchen both the walls and the countertop are made of birch plywood. A quartet of black Tom Dixon Beat lights hangs overhead.
The midcentury chairs, sofa, and coffee table in the living room were purchased at Guff in the East End of Toronto, where  the Loblaws live when they’re not at the cottage. The wood-burning stove is by Regency.
Architect Brian O’Brian and contractor Tom Clancy adapted a central breezeway, a distinguishing feature of dogtrot houses in the southeastern United States, for Joel and Michelle Loblaw’s cottage near the Georgian Bay in Meaford, Ontario.
In the bathroom, the sink is by Kohler and the tub is by Maax.
Emerson, 8, reads in a sitting room where overnight guests stay.
Joel, a landscape designer, created “a series of outdoor rooms,” including an alfresco kitchen that is sheltered beneath a cedar trellis. The Butterfly chairs are from Fresh Home and Garden in Toronto.
The flooring is distressed oak.
The east-west breezeway divides  the home into nearly equal halves: 700 square feet for bedrooms,  a bathroom, and the laundry, and 650 square feet for everything else.  To focus attention on the back­country wilderness, the team relied upon a restrained mix of materials, including tongue-and-groove cedar siding and a Vicwest corrugated-metal roofing product that is more commonly used for agri­cultural buildings.
Pixo Wall
The Pixo Desk Lamp is a consistent Dwell Store best seller. Designed by Pablo and Fernando Pardo with sustainability in mind, the lamp was created with a small footprint and a compact, energy-saving LED light. The ultra-efficient lamp features a swiveling light shade that makes it easy to focus and redirect light as needed. 

The Pixo Desk Lamp is currently on sale for 15% off at the Dwell Store until 10/23/2014.
The newly released Original 1227 Brass Desk Lamp in Elephant Grey is at once minimalist and statement making.
Custom folding doors, inspired by Rudolf M. Schindler’s 1930 Elliot House, were created by Rene Maya to Andrew’s specifications.
A pair of floating nightstands in the master bedroom are by Børge Mogensen; the sconces are by Kurt Versen and came with the house. The panel of fabric over the oak Matera bed from Design Within Reach is Incantation, by Lustig— the piece was originally  used as a curtain.
A floating cabinet was created by Lustig in 1953 for an interior design commission in New Jersey. The Sparrow crib is by Oeuf.
In daughter Elliot’s room, a vintage Womb chair by Eero Saarinen is situated below Alvar Aalto 112 sheIn daughter Elliot’s room, a vintage Womb chair by Eero Saarinen is situated below Alvar Aalto 112 shelving scored on eBay.
Andrew worked with
The front door is outfitted with a Saturn knob by Schlage; the same hardware was used as pulls at Lustig’s June Wayne House.
The den’s first-production Eames Desk Unit (EDU) was “rescued” from a Gregory Ain house.
Eric Lamers of Hammerhead, a craft-based contractor specializing in midcentury renovation projects, worked on the house before Andrew and his wife, Dustin Ferrer, acquired it in 2013, but it still needed a good deal of restoration. The home features an impressive collection of vintage furnishings, including an Elephant Stool by Sori Yanagi and a Luther Conover chair.
Andrew and Dustin were meticulous in their selections for the home’s furnishings and fixtures. In the dining area, a Vista of California table by Don Knorr is surrounded by Van Keppel-Green chairs.
Circa-1940s documents that were filed with the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety credit William H. Thomas, who was a very close friend of graphic designer Alvin Lustig, as the house’s “certified architect.” After extensive research conducted by the home’s previous owner, Andy Hackman, the house’s current owner, Andrew Romano, believes the structure was in fact Lustig’s own design.
Another view of the dining room reveals the original woodwork and character of the 19th-century structure.
The footed bathtub in the completely renovated bathroom is by Marc Newson for Caroma.

Dive into Dwell's photo archive of spectacular modern homes that embody great design. From midcentury gems to prefabricated units to eye-opening renovations, these inspirational projects are elegant responses to the site and the client's needs. Here, you'll find ideas for every room in the house, whether it be kitchen, bath, bedroom, living, or dining—and beyond.

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