86 Windows Picture Window Type Design Photos And Ideas

Modern windows have the vital task of connecting your home with the outside world. Bringing in air and light, they provide opportunities for contemplation when arranged above a dining nook, or a portal to the natural world when overlooking an oceanside scene. Framed with wood, metal, or vinyl, these inspiring window designs range from skylights to picture windows.

Back of the house.
"The central court acts as a glass ‘jewel’ at the heart of the house," say the architects, who styled it in the likeness of a Japanese garden.
The upper section of the façade is clad in timber, and features large steel-framed windows that extend slightly beyond the siding.
The exterior has wrapped in a black cladding with gray render. Large expanses of glazing create a strong visual connection to the forest outdoors.
Inside, plentiful windows offer fantastic views of the neighborhood's rooftops, as well as downtown Portland.
Potrero Residence  Facade
Looking north from the front door, one looks through a 12'h x 8' w window looking on the stone embedded in the landscape which came from the excavated bedrock when construction the home.
Windows and skylights have been strategically placed throughout to capture striking views of the surrounding trees. Here, a bedroom cantilevers above the entrance patio.
A punched-out square window acts as living art in the stairwell.
Each of the windows are deeply recessed, creating a frame-like effect.
The sloped ceiling of the loft space is covered in scalloped shingles painted blue.
The tree-shaped window frames bring an abstract forest indoors.
Wilson also incorporated high levels of insulation and double glazing to make the house energy efficient.
In winter, the wooden screens can be opened to draw in the warm, afternoon sun.
Windows transcend floor levels to discretely frame views of the surrounding neighborhood, offering slices of the vistas beyond.
A view of the temperate rainforest outdoors.
The main living area is connected to the back unit by a modern bridge. Polished concrete is used for both floors and ceilings, and a Mies van der Rohe Barcelona Stool accents the space.
A large window affords views of the environment.
The owners of the apartment wanted to expand their home vertically and horizontally in order to enjoy more spacious, attractive interiors.
Corner Window
Large windows let in natural light and views from all directions.
Polished concrete mixed with black volcanic sand is used for the floor, while the ceilings are lined in plasterboard.
A close-up of the windows meeting the stone wall.
Full height glazing provides a direct visual connection to the exterior foliage.
In the ground floor apartment, "there are picture windows with operable awning [windows] below, which provide the cross ventilation," said Wiedemann.
While the homeowners and their guests have plenty of opportunities to view the outdoors, thanks in large part to windows and doors by Alumilex, an abundance of cedars offers privacy from the outside looking in. “We wanted to cut the least amount of trees,” Tremblay said.
A sauna that looks out to the lake.
Picture windows frame views on both ends of the kitchen of the kitchen counter.
Girodo says the “high insulation performance of the shell” allows the building to function in a setting that experiences significant temperature fluctuations and extreme cold. Occupants of the front room, which functions as a reception area, can take in the views from its full-height windows in complete comfort.
The extensive use of natural wood on nearly every surface makes the inside of The Barn feel like an extension of the landscape outside.
The master suite is filled with plentiful views, while taking advantage of the forest of cedars to provide complete privacy year round.
Floor-to-ceiling windows provide ample natural light and look out onto the landscape.
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Front Entry Door & Privacy Screen
Large format Fiandre floor tiles fill the entry sequence and align with the building module.
“It’s a great house for a young family—playful, practical and different,” Tribe says. “You can sit on the windowsill in the sun and feed the baby, kids can climb in and out, often through the windows, and you can see everything that is going on.”
The architects worked closely with the clients to match the aesthetic of the vintage furniture they collect. The midcentury modern Danish chair, seen right, has been refurbished and reupholstered.
The two wings of the addition are connected by a central “void space.” The glass walls visually draw the garden and greenery into the living space. Both East Coast transplants, the couple wanted to more easily take advantage of favorable gardening conditions in the mild Northern California climate. With this in mind, they used the renovation to bring the outdoors in, as well as encourage easy and direct exterior access for gardening.
The original home was preserved and renovated. In the front bedroom, a small window was replaced with a large painted-steel window seat, a favorite of the residents' grandchildren.
Views of the Orobie Alps can be seen from the home’s windows, which also feature larch frames. A lampadina light by Flos sits on the nightstand.
The sleeping cubbies lie beneath the walkway connecting front and back units. Cedar decking and soffit add warmth and texture to the transitional space.
an airy space punctuated by delicate black frames