The Best Photos of Modern Homes, Bathrooms, Kitchens, and More

Near the kitchen, a Moel chair by Inga Sempé for Ligne Roset joins a bar trolley, side table, and pouf from Crate and Barrel. A Yannis Gaitis lithograph hangs on a wall of white oak plywood. Architect Mike Shively came up with the vertical strips to add texture.
A wood countertop with blue laminate cabinets underneath contrasts with a white island topped with travertine. The wall tile is Origin Birch White by AKDO, and the brass faucet is by California Faucets. As in the rest of the apartment, the flooring is colored cork from Globus Cork.
General contractor S Construction collaborated with Shively and Kokkino on the remodel. The colorful apartment pays homage to the midcentury building, a 1968 high-rise in the Edgewater neighborhood, but it also has a more subdued side. The master bedroom is an all-white sanctuary filled with houseplants. The Rudd International oak sideboard is a vintage piece from the 1970s.
An Alekos Fassianos lithograph and soft blue niches offset the wood paneling. An IC lamp by Michael Anastassiades hangs in the hallway.
Kitchen
Staircase to Second Floor
Master Bathroom
Office/Den/Third Bedroom
Side View
Cantilevered deck from Lake Michigan shore beach side.
Entry at Sunset
Before Photo of Entry
Entry Area post remodel
Exterior Elevation
A EuroStone countertop structures the open-plan kitchen and dining room, where the family will often gather and play.
The outdoor living room serves as both a counterpoint and extension of the interior, with amenities that include a Gandia Blasco dining table and bench, a Lynx grill, and a custom concrete fire pit designed by Kathleen Ferguson; it sits atop a bed of crushed white rock. A built-in bench runs along the length of the courtyard.
The stairway features built-in shelving that's accessible from both sides.
The Stonorovs couldn’t find a crib they liked and that fit their budget, so Tolya 

custom-made Niko’s sleeper out of walnut plywood and 3form plastic circles laser-cut by East Bay Laser & Waterjet. Otto made the sliding changing table out of solid walnut. Worried that their dog, Oscar, was feeling neglected, he built a Japanese-style water and food dish for him.
Tolya and Otto's handiwork, such as the cabinetry in the master bedroom, helps keep the lines of the house clean and the rooms tidy.
Self-proclaimed perfectionists Tolya and Otto “obsessed about making everything” themselves—–from the windows down to the beds.
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.
Even in the Stonorovs’ tiny first-floor room, the curse of the kitchen as the inevitable gathering place lives on—–though the two-foot space between the sink and metal island is less than ideal for the family of three and their blue heeler, Oscar.
North Elevation
The entire house is marked by dramatic changes in color: Though the walls are white, the floors and ceiling swap tones, and pink fluorescent lights give way to a lavender bedroom ceiling. The domestic spectrum culminates in the orange floor and curtains of the rooftop penthouse—–proving that even diamond-plate steel and ventilation ducts, given some Safecoat paint, can be made as colorful and warm as a kindergarten.
A garden path in the backyard was paved with discarded marble windowsills and stone doorframes. This reuse of ruins adds texture to the landscape.
Lawrence relaxes in the master bedroom with a hand-rolled cigarette. The room 

has a lavender ceiling (Alice was told it’s the best color to see when waking).
The Weiners sit in one of the many large window bays, showing how the reused truck bodies look from within.
Pieces from Lawrence’s voluminous archive act like unintentional architectural ornaments, bringing color and humanity to the often Spartan LOT-EK design.
Lawrence and Alice confer in the ground-floor kitchen. Traces of color are visible everywhere, including the orange-and-yellow curtains and pink coathooks.
A collection of objects from Lawrence’s desk include stencils, paint rags, glasses, and a notebook.
The back garden includes fragments of stone from the earlier building.
Lawrence Weiner sits at his daylit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking 

up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel.
It feeds their backyard garden, which also features permeable paving rocks, a composting  bin, and a surrounding fence made  of knotty Western red cedar.
A Vitsœ shelving system and a  collection of bamboo baskets made in Vietnam occupy a sunny corner in the office that Lauren and Keith share on the top floor.