412 Staircase Metal Railing Wood Tread Design Photos And Ideas

A timber stair curves up behind the living and sleeping platform on the ground floor. The curved details of the timber and earth walls echo the organic form of the building.
The Perezes created an office area, storage beneath the stairs, and a sliding door that sections the kitchen from the bathroom.
A walnut-and-steel staircase leads to the upper level. Massive, upcycled, old-growth Douglas fir beams line the ceiling.
The entry foyer at the ground level features a hanging Vibia Wireflow light from KODA and an Ari daybed from Something Beginning With.
The staircase handrail was custom designed by Unicus Developments specifically for this renovation. It’s constructed from a combination of iron and unlacquered brass. The craftsman applied a step notch—a linear cutout—to each stair tread.
The home’s centerpiece spiral staircase connects all three levels. Designed by Tom on Solidworks, the blanks were cut in a friend’s woodshed and later assembled on-site.
The downstairs hallway flooring is Iranian travertine marble, while the stair and flooring in the upstairs hallway is oak. The walls have been finished with a polished concrete texture.
The staircase is offset from the straight walls to emphasize its curvaceous lines.
A spiral stairway leads to the newly constructed basement. “It’s like a piece of playground equipment in the house,” says Sean Hogan of M Studio Architecture.
A perforated metal screen acts as a guardrail for the interior stair while introducing another layer of light filtration.
Vertical wood post act as a screen between circulation and sleeping spaces. An exterior, double-height wall of translucent Rodeca cladding extends along the staircase, leading you to the master bedroom loft.
Inside, wood adds softness, texture, and warmth while allowing light to filter through.  At the stair and master bedroom loft above, timber is used as an architectural screening material which provides some partition between spaces.
The design team subtly sculpted the wall around the top of the staircase. A CB2 Azalea Gray Mink chair sits in the hall.
“The bones of the original stair are in there,” says McGuier. “We just sawed off the bottom half, put a new straight portion of stair onto the spiral stair, then covered the whole thing in sheet metal and painted it.” Vintage slipper chairs in mohair sit on either side of a vintage Art Deco parchment table.
The Newry House is all about playful moments of discovery and delight for this growing family.
To maximize functionality in the compact space, the staircase, kitchen, and storage area were all combined into one unit. Simple wood joinery conceals integrated storage below the wood stair treads and the perforated steel screen.
Under the main staircase is a shaded secondary stairway.
The stairwell features white oak vertical slats and silva oak treads and risers supplied by European Touch Hardwood Floors.
Stairs lead up to the second floor. The project's minimalist materials highlight the collaboration between architect, designer and builder—achieving a look that also represents the client’s keen sense of modern minimalism.
A new steel staircase with wood tread and a cable railing does not block the outside views. The double-height window systems used at the front and back of the home are glass storefront units from YKK.
Architect Catherine Milanese wanted to use a single material—fir plywood—for the stringer, the stairs, and the risers, visually integrating the stairway with the wood box that contains the mezzanine level.
The main stair to the mezzanine level is accessed by set of steps that can be moved out of the way when not in use.
The stairs were stripped back to just the steps and upgraded with a new steel handrail and spindles. The treads were finished with OSMO ebony oil.
Upstairs, there’s a second-floor office and work by the homeowners’ daughter, artist Kat Marais.
The yellow-painted stair is crafted from Kowhai, a dense and durable native timber.
Much of the original detail throughout the house was retained and refurbished, such as the barrel-vaulted ceilings, metal railing, and woodwork in the front hall.
A cedar-clad stair leads up to the 1,005-square-foot phase one house, while maple panels line the pitched interior ceilings.
A simple metal railing and Red Acacia flooring create a minimalist aesthetic for the loft area.
Solid walnut slabs were used for the interior stair treads—a beautiful and durable choice. Sunlight from a skylight above filters through the space, creating delicate patterns of light and shadow as it passes through the screen.
A slatted walnut screen is a centerpiece of the home’s new design. Accentuating the height of the space, the vertical slats come together with metal rods and a sleek handrail, creating a graphic manipulation of positive and negative space. In addition to allowing light to permeate the interior, the screen is visible from most vantage points in the home, providing an anchor of visual interest.
The reimagined entry stair favors rich and warm walnut hues, leading visitors to the relocated third-floor kitchen.
Stairs lead down to the semi-below grade bedrooms.
Clinton Cole, architect, builder, and director at CPlusC Architectural Workshop, gave Welcome to the Jungle House, his family's home in suburban Sydney, the eco-friendly treatment, what with a solar-panel facade, rainwater harvesting, and a rooftop full of fruits and vegetables and a fish pond. Visitors are first ushered into the imposing steel "shroud" entry, facing the timber-clad staircase.
Architect Bill Ryall installed vertical circulation elements, opened an unobstructed 47-foot-long view from front to back, and kept the ceiling beams exposed to create a loft-like environment.
Stair Detail
Main Entry
Connecting the old and new spaces is an oak and steel spiral staircase. Set against a geometric oriel window, the staircase bay slightly protrudes from the side the facade, offering the only visible hint of the modern materials used in back.
Behind the white wall with the oval window lies the central plunge pool, one of the architects’ favorite features in the home.
The mezzanine and upper loft are clad in wood, which fosters consistency with the lower level.
If you have an underutilized space in your home (like underneath a staircase), consider turning it into an indoor garden.
Floating tread allows sight lines between the entry and the opposite side of the room.
The staircase is a sculptural feature that brings together all of the elements of the project palette, including white concrete at the base, wood, and black steel. The white concrete is meant to appear as though it is emerging from the wood platform.
A Frank Gehry Wiggle Chair and Globe light from Ligne Roset sit beneath the stair. The metal encircling the concrete pillar was finished to match all of the other metal elements.

Photo: Mike Schwartz
The firm eliminated the awkward, angled section of mezzanine above and moved the working elements of the kitchen down the wall. Doing so gave the entry breathing room and now the corridor is lined with functional storage.
A wood-burning stove keeps the well-insulated cabin warm in winter. To the right is the alternating tread staircase that leads to the mezzanine.
Granito tiles line the back wall of the stairwell.
The staircase in the mudroom is made of raw steel kickplates and treads created from locally harvested sugar maples.
The partial basement holds storage and an entertainment room. A skylight over the stairs floods the area with natural light.
With white oak treads and a steel-and-glass railing, the new staircase is much more elegant.
The staircase may just be the most impressive feature as it combines all of the materials in an architectural element that is both sculptural and functional.

Whether grand and sweeping, rendered in wood, or a minimalist arrangment of metal and glass, the modern staircase is an example of literally elevated design. With its strong, geometric shape and functional importance, a masterful staircase can serve as the centerpiece of a building. Below are some notable examples of staircases that refuse to be ignored, and the creative tread and railing decisions that comprise them.