69 Shed & Studio Design Photos And Ideas

If you have ever considered building a modern shed or studio in the backyard, you'll appreciate the projects below, which prove that small spaces can deliver a big impact. Transform this often dormant space into a family room, hobby studio, or meditation room. Give the humble backyard shed a chance to shine—forge an opportunity for better living or enhanced storage.

With little to no permitting required, Sett Studio units can be used for an extra bedroom, a yoga studio, a hydroponics growing area or an office space, like this 96-square-foot one shown here.
Suspended in a garden in private residence in the northwest of Washington DC, this bronze and glass building, which is illuminated from the ground up, looks like a Japanese tea pavilion, but is in fact a musical recital space that its owner also use as a room for dining and contemplation.
Kahn's painting studio is attached to the original garage.
An Ecospace with a dual-pitched roof, this gym in England’s Peak District has a sloping roof, skylights that brighten and ventilate the space and a mezzanine loft-style living space.
Portland, Oregon–based architects Heidi Beebe and Doug Skidmore designed a glass-walled studio to create a focal point in backyard of this Boise, Idaho house, and as a home office for one of the owners.
This Seattle studio shed that is sited on a plant-filled backyard is used by it’s owners as a place to engage in their diverse passions – painting, sculpture, and gardening and collecting vintage furniture.
An old unused garage in this San Francisco family home is turned into a “box suffused with light” just a short distance from the main house, where family members can escape to meditate, relax or get creative.
Interior of Midden Studio in Scotland.
When a Colorado web designer’s newborn daughter moved into his home office, he relocated to this cool shed made of ruby-red Collins Truwood Siding and corrugated metal, just a few feet from the back door of his house.
Designed by Stockholm firm Waldemarson Berglund Arkitekter, this prefab artist studio called Ateljé 25 is shaped like a Monopoly house, serves as an artist’s studio and has simple plywood interiors and massive skylights.
The auditorium is so acoustically isolated that the cocktail lounge is able to stay open during shows.
The first-floor auditorium/recording studio is located in a curvaceous wood pod that hovers above the bar in the basement. Concrete structural buttresses support the wall and act as stylized booth dividers.
The home’s cedar siding is untreated, and its zinc  roof will “mellow” over time, according to architect Peter Pfau.
Stefanie designed the hut. It was constructed by landscaper Ronald Gramajo, who also did the plantings and irrigation on the property.
The sauna door handle is a simple piece of driftwood. “One principle rule I followed,” says Kiehl, “was: Don’t build on outdoor space if it can work as outdoor living space. Norwegian summers are short. We want to be outdoors as much as possible.”
Work It

“We wanted to open up the back of the house, but there’s nothing to look at,” says Dana. “So we decided to put something in our yard as a focal point, to create our own view.” The architects came up with a glass-walled studio, which Dana uses as 

her home office. The architects mounted a steel I-beam that spans the yard, with holes drilled at eight-inch intervals for maximum flexibility of use. Right now it’s used for Ikea play equipment, but later they plan to hang a hammock and a movie screen.

ikea.com
Working with his colleagues at Austin Maynard Architects, architect Andrew Maynard added a 184-square-foot, sun-saturated greenhouse extension to his existing 364-square-foot home, and the new space serves as an office for him and his team.
The Backyard Lounge and Office is 330 square feet and features windows on all sides.
Studio
Phillips designed Judith a stark white, glass-fronted art studio.
A parallelogram-shaped window pane, rescued from an architectural salvage yard, was outfitted with steel edges and casters, and repurposed as a coffee table. Photo by Alan Gastelum.
Podere 43 allows for an endless array of leisure activities like ping-pong.
Sea caves on the property forced the architects to split some of the living space into a 483-square-foot guesthouse.
The Shudio and patio with privacy trellis.
The Porter cottage makes the most of its unwieldy site. The cottage was sited as close to the water as legally allowed to take advantage of the views and far enough away from the graywater leach field where the soil is deep enough to allow for proper run off. The screen porch was angled to capture direct southern exposure for the solar panels.
Architect Indra Janda hand-cut sheets of polycarbonate into 15¾-inch square shingles and clad the entire timber structure—a gabled roof and walls—with them.
A Norwegian boathouse. Photo Courtesy of Pasi Aalto / TASCHEN #cabin #boathouse
A knotted curtain bisects the sleeping area from the kitchen, which contains concealed and exposed storage units, as well as a small circular dining table.
The modular shoveled and drawers were designed into four separate categories based on the measurement of each object.
The renovated attic is oriented around a central volume that houses the bathroom. The wooden shelves were fashioned from hemlock planks that were salvaged during the demolition of the roof structure.
The fireplace is located at the original chimney stack of the building. Robb Studio created a sculptural fireplace using exposed concrete, steel, and Shou-sugi-ban wood for the hearth seat.
Sett Studio also does complete interior work. This unit features monotread, which are panels made from milled recycled wood, on the floor, walls and desk. Lately, the company has been using more bamboo.
The lantern addition is utilized mostly as an open dining room leading to the patio and pool beyond. Misra and Pande worked with the couple’s existing furniture, such as the Philippe Starck Ghost chairs, and helped integrate new elements such as the custom-made chandelier.
Merge Architects wrapped the peg wall around three sides of a bathroom to hide a door and provide a storage for books and knick knacks.
A platform bed is tucked behind a small living nook with a sofa and projector.
The Writer's Block is a piece of custom oak veneer millwork that both divides the space and acts as furniture.
The picture wall is adorned with images collected from family, colleagues, and estate sales. ”I kill plants, so cacti are our friends,” Peter says of the succulents along the low table behind the Design Within Reach sofa, just over which an Established & Sons Font clock keeps time.
Each of the sliding trays in Pozner’s tidy office desk serves a different function.
A matching desk also folds up and away.
The skylight illuminates the nook for reading and lounging.
The compact rental features plenty of wooden ledges, nooks, and shelves for keeping belongings organized. In the living room, a low white wall is capped with fir wood salvaged from the garage’s former posts. On the east wall, a half-door made of reclaimed cedar looks out on a garden.  “It looks and lives a lot bigger than it is,” Schaer says.
Stowing the queen-size Room Makers Murphy bed by SICO frees up access to custom built-in cabinets and pull-down closet rods by Hafele that illuminate when the door is opened.
Davor (with his wife, Abbe, and son, August) designed the main living and dining pavilion as a double-height space to increase its perceived volume, and added high cubbies for extra storage.
This "local prefab" home on the Isle of Skye is made mostly from materials sourced in northern Scotland. The timber-framed model, meant to evoke the simple agrarian barns of the area, can be constructed on-site in as little as a day and is designed for affordability.
The rusting steel is an important part of the house’s patina, Campbell says. “We appreciate materials in the raw,” he adds. “The tables aren’t stained; the steel isn’t painted. The materials are what they are.”
The Weber residence sits comfortably in the rich, green Wisconsin valley.
An orange lantern lights the way to an angular gray structure.
Before building on the North Island of New Zealand, two friends spent years replanting the site. The 290-square-foot structures Cheshire Architects designed for them reject the local trend of oversize beach houses—instead, they sit on the landscape like a pair of minimalist sculptures.
Constructed on land he had owned for years, this tiny cabin is also totally green.
Exterior of the backyard studio Riley McFerrin of Hinterland Design built for his client, a children's book illustrator.
Marco V. Morelli says his Studio Shed is the perfect refuge. “It’s changed my life for the better,” he says. “I’ve gotten so much more work done, and I think my marital relations are much better because I have a place of my own.”

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