Truth to materials is a major tenet of modern architecture. Concrete is one place we see this axiom in action. Historically concrete that was used in construction would be clad to make it appear as something other. Modern architecture uses concrete where appropriate and then exposes it. The Brutalist Movement was the height of concrete celebration.

Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
When renovating a house in McAllen, Texas, for his brother-in-law’s family, architect Luis López designed an overhang with concrete beams that protects the front entrance from the area’s frequent rain. A large front window was inserted to provide views through the house to the backyard.
In the entryway, a Tati lamp by Ferruccio Laviani for Kartell sits on a shelf Christopher made from kitchen cabinetry scraps.
Located off of the kitchen, Vivi’s office disappears behind sliding walls covered in black chalkboard paint from Behr. This is one of the best home office setup ideas if you're short on space or if you're going for a minimalist look.
With doors open, Shino and Ken pull an Eames LCW chair for Herman Miller outside to enjoy the space.
Arthur installed shelving from Ikea and poured a cast-in-place concrete shelf to create a small media nook.
It took six weeks to build the formwork for the poured-concrete walls that make up the first floor. Inthe 

kitchen the floors are raw European white oak, the countertops are Capolavoro granite with a leather finish by Antolini, and the natural oak cabinets are by Varenna.
The Perth residence of Renee Coleman via the Design Files.
After entering through the front door, visitors pass over the large koi pond on a cast-concrete footbridge chiseled to look like stone.
Porches and rolling glass doors draw in the river breeze to keep the home cool.
We love this sleek home office design layout, where steel details contrast mesquite flooring throughout the home, including at the pathway to the "crow’s nest" office. It's also a great option if you're looking for home office ideas for small spaces.
Scott Wallace and Tara Coco turned to Lake|Flato Architects and its modular Porch House system for a family compound on the banks of the Blanco River in Wimberley, Texas. The design integrates private spaces with public gathering spots, including a deck that serves as an outdoor living room.
In the kitchen, Dedo stools by Simone Simonelli for Miniforms pull underneath a poured-in-place concrete countertop.
The Bare Bones Domino Set is cast from concrete, giving the classic game a fabricated enhancement. Completely rethought from traditional dominoes, this grainy set features an angled shape, subtle numbering system, and a weightiness that gives the dominoes an undeniably substantial quality.
Nakada works from an Alvar Aalto table in the living and dining area, adjacent to the kitchen. He saved on some elements, such as the plywood cabinetry, and splurged on others, such as the Finn Juhl chairs and Vilhelm Lauritzen lamp. A skylight beneath the angled roof allows in a sliver of constantly changing light.
On a trip to Naoshima, Japan, the Houston newlyweds behind Robertson Design fell in love with Tadao Ando’s concrete-composed museums. This led the couple to create a residence of their own comprised of a low concrete wall, concrete cube, and box clad in Siberian larch. The indoors are rounded out with white oak, marble, and leather-finished granite.
The low windows in the master bedroom focus the view on the backyard, not the neighbors. Christopher designed the solid poplar platform bed.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
White-oak stairs connect the first-floor living spaces with the upstairs sleeping areas.
An outdoor shower tucked behind a screen off the master bedroom neutralizes this threat. “We thought it sounded great for muddy kids to run up and shower off there,” Coco says.