The promise of cabin living is that with a little land and some ingenuity we can have simpler times and more nature.

Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Updating the A-frame of yore, this home’s liberal use of windows makes the most of panoramic views spanning two valleys. Catalonia, Spain. Cadaval & Sola-Morales from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Those seeking isolation and inspiration to tackle their work need look no further. A minimalist cube set against a picturesque background form a studio free of distraction, except maybe that view! Newfoundland, Canada. By Saunders Architecture from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
A wooden home nestled amongst a cluster of Japanese larch trees offers a perfect sanctuary from nearby Tokyo. Chubu, Japan. By Koji Tsutsui & Associates from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Livable sculpture at its finest. Created for the Zermatt Festival, an annual festival of chamber music, this structure (designed by a team of second-year architecture students!) maximizes the beauty of its surroundings with its 720-degree spiral composition. Valais, Switzerland. By Alice Studio/Atelier de la Conception de l’ Espace from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Every piece of the structure is crafted by local builders, according to traditional Japanese construction methods. Chubu, Japan. By Koji Tsutsui & Associates from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Rock the Shack: The Architecture of Cabins, Cocoons and Hide-Outs. Edited by Sven Ehmann, Sofia Borges. Copyright Gestalten 2013.
A white-filled (not to mention light-filled) interior bring the minimalist design inside. Newfoundland, Canada. By Saunders Architecture from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
These temporary residences are prefabricated on the mainland before reaching their destination to ensure minimal impact on the environment. Lifted on pillars to further diminish interference with the natural terrain, each hut houses six people.  Easter Island, Chile. By AATA Arquitectos from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
During snowy winters, the white interiors seamlessly blend with the home’s exterior. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
These custom-built colorful cabins allow lifeguards to maintain a watchful eye over beachgoers in style. Part de-Stijl, part Saved by the Bell, we can picture Zack Morris wooing many a beach babe perched atop one of these. Southeastern Florida, USA. By Léo Caillard from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
The geometric framing lining the interiors echoes the facade's asymmetrical shape. Easter Island, Chile. By AATA Arquitectos from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
A shark-skinning shack.
Sævik compares her house to a contemplative hideout. “It’s very quiet,” she says. “You can concentrate and let thoughts fly.” Her favorite summer pastimes include reading, painting, drawing, yoga, and “just sitting and feeling the forest,” she says.
When not in use as the headboard, the large redwood slab folds down to become a desk.
The house is divided into three sections connected by a series of outdoor galleries. “When I walk from one room to another, I have to go outdoors and feel the weather and nature—rain, cold, and sun,” says Sævik. 

Instead of emphasizing the expansive panorama of oak, pine, and aspen trees, the house frames select views—a move inspired by Japanese design.
The couple asked for a “no maintenance, not low maintenance” backyard. However, Shino tends to “Carlsbad's largest public bathroom for cats” (otherwise known as their Japanese-style rock garden) about once a month.

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superrkül dubbed this project the Stealth Cabin because it's hidden in the landscape and will continue to recede in view over time. Photo by Shai Gil.
Across the path is the resident's favorite spot from which to take in the aquatic tableau: a rock garden and sitting area created by landscape designer Tory Polone. Chairs rest near the a hidden grade-level gas fire pit—an on-demand campfire.