The conclusion of World War II brought a huge influx of American optimism, which led to a burgeoning middle class interested in buying and nesting. The midcentury modern era left an indelible mark on modern design. In product design, midcentury modern masters include Ray Eames, Charles Eames, Achille Castiglioni, Arne Jacobson, Isamu Noguchi, Jean Prouve, Eero Saarinen, Poul Kjaerholm, Hans Wegner, Charlotte Perriand, and Alvar Aalto. Giants of modern architecture include Mies van der Rohe, Ray and Charles Eames, Rudolph Schindler, Paul Rudolph, Charles Ellsworth, and Richard Neutra.

Leo Marmol and Alisa Becket enjoy one of their home’s many outdoor spaces.
An outdoor shower was the family’s first construction project. “Doing the shower made us realize we can build things the way we want to build them,” says Meg.
The LV’s master bedroom has direct outdoor access, like every other room in the house. Bed by IKEA.
Architectural designer Sebastian Mariscal and project manager Jeff Svitak created a house in Venice, California, for Michael and Tamami Sylvester. Known as Dwell Home Venice for its role as an exemplification of modern architecture, the house is an homage to indoor-outdoor living. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
Orpilla pecks, Apolo pedals.
Glass walls divide up the spaces throughout the home.
For the kitchen, American cherry wood was used to create cabinets that establish a warm and sturdy tone. Each piece of lumber was purchased at auction by the Brillharts and stored in New Hampshire, before being shipped to Miami and milled on site. The wood island is painted black to provide a point of visual contrast.
A pool located just outside the dining space and master bedroom echoes the home's angular forms.
The living and dining room look out to the central courtyard, promoting indoor/outdoor living. Here, five doors slide into a pocket in the wall to create a nearly 23-foot-wide opening on one side looking into the garden. Another set on the opposite side enhances cross ventilation.
In the outdoor dining room, wire chairs by Harry Bertoia for Knoll surround a mango wood table made by a local carpenter, Diego Madrazo.
The semi-outdoor space extends the living room outward. Inside, a layer of glass sliding doors further facilitate breezes. The occupants can enjoy the sound and smell of rain behind shelter.
For the kitchen, American cherry wood was used to create cabinets that establish a warm and sturdy tone. Each piece of lumber was purchased at auction by the Brillharts and stored in New Hampshire, before being shipped to Miami and milled on site. The wood island is painted black to provide a point of visual contrast. Himalayan marble countertops and stainless steel appliances lend moments of clean modernism to the kitchen, which is flooded with bright light thanks to patio windows that open to the yard.
The lower floor houses a spa, gym, and office. A built-in bathroom by Espace Cuisine includes a sauna.
Between the front and rear exteriors, over 800-square-feet of patio space extend the living areas into the outdoors. From this angle, the references to Florida cracker architecture are obvious. The sleeping quarters are connected via a central corridor and kitchen to the living space on the other end of the building, a modern interpretation of the classic dogtrot house.
A guest bedroom, with furniture from Room & Board, overlooks the bridge above the dining courtyard. The home’s landscape architecture is by Ventura, California–based Jack Kiesel. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
Michael and Tamami brought greenery to the master bath courtyard, which is lined with Eco Arbor Designs deck tiles, in the form of succulents in a ceramic Peanut planter by John Follis for Architectural Pottery from Vessel. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
The knotty cedar cladding from Crenshaw Lumber was pretreated with an ebony stain from Timber Pro UV—twice on both sides—prior to being brought to the site, where it was left for eight weeks so that it could adjust to the moist seaside air before installation. “Cedar siding swells or shrinks when it gains or loses moisture while it reaches equilibrium with the content of the surrounding air,” says Michael. Photo by Coral von Zumwalt.
A Nelson Saucer Pendant Lamp by George Nelson hangs over the dining table with Eames Molded Plastic armchairs to compliment the surrounding set of chairs.
The architects felt that a strong vertical addition would draw extra attention to the original house’s strong horizontal character. The tower itself is a reinterpretation of an A-frame from another Strenger house five doors down.
A bird’s-eye view of Dwell Outdoor reveals the Monogram Modern Home and the Loll Beer Garden.