The conclusion of World War II brought a huge influx of American optimism, which led to a burgeoning middle class interested in buying and nesting. The midcentury modern era left an indelible mark on modern design. In product design, midcentury modern masters include Ray Eames, Charles Eames, Achille Castiglioni, Arne Jacobson, Isamu Noguchi, Jean Prouve, Eero Saarinen, Poul Kjaerholm, Hans Wegner, Charlotte Perriand, and Alvar Aalto. Giants of modern architecture include Mies van der Rohe, Ray and Charles Eames, Rudolph Schindler, Paul Rudolph, Charles Ellsworth, and Richard Neutra.

In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.
In their concrete-walled courtyard, Yuka and Aaron watch as twins Emerson and Jasper, daughters Maude and Mirene, and Alfie the dog play. The house is painted in Black Bean Soup by Benjamin Moore, a color in keeping with the period of the original architecture
Lambert pours wine in the kitchen, which is defined by a low concrete-block wall and serves as the home’s central core. The seating-area chairs are from Herman Miller.
Big Branch Woodworking and Lackey Construction fabricated the cabinetry throughout the home, including the birch built-ins in the mudroom, designed by Jessica Helgerson Interior Design. Each family member has his or her own cubby with storage for coats, shoes, hats and gloves, with built-in outlets for charging iPhones.
The formal lounge plays host to Angelucci’s collection of mid-century modern furniture. A pair of Leather Sling chairs by Aussie-born sculptor Clement Meadmore sit under the window; a black Snoopy lamp by Achille Castiglioni for Flos is on the mantle.
The clients had an impressive collection of Scandinavian midcentury teak furniture that now pops beautifully against the concrete floors, white-painted brick, and pine v-joint walls.
A home in Krisel's Kings Point development, an 11-acre site off of the Canyon Country Club golf course that was designed in the early 1960s.
The clerestory windows were originally screens covered by sliding plywood panels that could be opened to allow in light and air.
Eliot Noyes's 1954 home is a simple, one-story building clad in fieldstone and wood, which blends easily into the landscape.
The kitchen of the La Casa di Ucello Bianca. As architect Ron Radziner says in the book's forward, Chavkin's color photogrpahy captures the light so essential to experiencing the West Coast's desert modernism.
The Sandpiper is a group of nine real estate subdivisions (306 homes in total), designed by Krisel and built between 1958 and 1969. Krisel also did all the landscape design for the site.
Katherine Lambert, a partner at Metropolitan Architectural Practice (MAP), and her business associate Christiane Robbins, painstakingly restored a 1950s redwood-and-glass house in Napa, California, originally designed by Jack Hillmer of Telesis.
A John Baldessari photograph rests on a shelf above a built-in desk just around the corner from the kitchen.
"Key to the special nature of the pavilion’s purpose is that guests are immersed in the landscape and surrounded by the vines that produced the actual wine that they are tasting," Warner and McCabe say. We couldn't agree more. Head to quintessa.com to learn more about the winery and book a reservation to experience the pavilions firsthand.
MID-CENTURY MODERN TRIVET $45 – $100

Designed by Fredrick Arndt in eco-friendly American black walnut, this trivet is right up our ally. We love the variation in the wood grain pattern and the sleek and structured design. It's a perfect bit of modernity for the table.
The family room boasts a Monza Triennale Floor Lamp by Gino Sarfatti and a Long John Bench by Edward Wormley, both from the 1950s, as well as a pair of ‘60s rosewood and leather ‘925’ lounge chairs by Arfa and Tobia Scarpa. Pieces by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Alvar Aalto also fill the space.
The formal lounge plays host to Angelucci’s collection of mid-century modern furniture. A pair of Leather Sling chairs by Aussie-born sculptor Clement Meadmore sit under the window; a black Snoopy lamp by Achille Castiglioni for Flos is on the mantle.
Telesis 2.0 Floor Plan

A    Bedroom

B    Office

C    Entrance

D    Patio

E    Living Room

F    Laundry–Utility Room

G    Kitchen

H    Bathroom
879 N Monte Vista, Palm Springs