Bedrooms are a place that we spend a lot of time. It's important to think through everything from beds, night tables, bedside lamps, TV stands (if you are so inclined), rugs, sheets, and pillows. Also, it's important to think of the vibe that you want to have in your bedroom design. We hope these images give you inspiration as you design your modern bedroom.

King installed dimmable fluorescent strips by Bartco in the alcoves above the cabinets for ambient lighting.
Painters accomplished the high-gloss finish on the cabinets of a kitchen in San Francisco by applying a coat of paint, polishing it with very high-grit sandpaper, repeating the process for each layer, then topping it with three coats of clear varnish. “It’s like an auto body,” says builder Jeff King. “It’s incredibly beautiful.”
Designer Jeff Sand’s Universal Chairs combine his love for classic French café chairs with an appreciation for “the beautiful metal casings on an old Moto Guzzi.” Sand Studios also designed the dining table and pendant lamp.
In the second floor master bedroom, a custom captain’s bed designed by the homeowner, features drawers and storage underneath. Its towering height allows for views out the nearby window.
“The house was designed to complement the challenging triangular corner site and its context.” —George Bradley, architect.
A shallow built-in bathroom shelf.
The residents incorporated speed racks into the cabinets. Typically found in restaurants, the racks offer chefs intermediate storage. In this case, the couple places food behind the cabinet until it’s ready to serve. After the meal is over, they can stow dirty dishes out of sight instead of interrupting the party with cleanup. To ensure trays slide in and out without catching the cabinet, King used hinges that allow the door to rotate 270 degrees.
Heath Ceramics tile continues in the master bathroom.
The entrance opens into a light-filled hall, with a Marcel Wanders chandelier and a Luna console table by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance.
The coffee station features a professional-grade Rocket Espresso machine. Jang and King designed a stainless-steel pullout shelf for a cream and sugar station.
“We wanted windows and natural light. It’s not quite a fishbowl—we have shades for privacy.” —Eddie Baba, resident.
The roof deck has a commanding view. “We have friends out here in the summer and stay too long drinking wine,” says Bradley.
In the master bedroom, the gable roof and balcony foster the illusion of generous space. A free-standing wall divides the sleeping space from the bathroom.
Across from the entrance is the main staircase, which leads to the bedrooms.
The three levels of the house transition from public to private: The ground floor is composed of the kitchen and living-dining area; the bathroom and closet occupy the mezzanine, accessed by a ship’s ladder; and the sleeping loft hovers a couple steps above. The seminal 1970s tome A Pattern Language, written by Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa, and Murray Silverstein, inspired the layout. “I’m a huge proponent of the [book],” says Azevedo. “I like the ideas of a bed as an alcove, natural light on two sides of a room, varying ceiling heights, and different levels of privacy.”
The bed is from Room & Board.
A sliding door separates the upstairs hall from the master bedroom, furnished with a pair of Donald Judd chairs.
Eric Schneider and Michael Chen take in the space-efficient renovation.
The space is just off the kitchen, which was moved and updated. Bradley paired cabinetry of his own design with tiles from Heath Ceramics.
Baba and Bradley descend the staircase leading to the second-floor entrance, located above an in-law rental unit. The steel buoys are World War II era.

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