“Design is so simple. That’s why it’s so complicated.” –Paul Rand

Roberto Burneo designed this home for his eldest niece, her husband, and their three young children in a suburb outside Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The house is set on a flat expanse of land with fruit trees, and Burneo's design "guides the social areas inward in order to link them to the gardens.”
Burneo took advantage of the perpendicular orientation of the volumes to create outdoor spaces that look out to the gardens.
Sawn wood planks add texture to the interior walls.
Burneo oriented the house in a pair of perpendicular volumes. The ground floor houses the public areas, including a study, while the top volume, housing the bedrooms and a family room, is oriented north-south, allowing for warm sunlight and a visual orientation toward the gardens.
Burneo added exposed brick to his palette of interior materials.
The custom kitchen counters are concrete, and the yellow dining chairs add a welcome splash of color.
Florida couple John Pirman and Steve Tetreault built a new house inspired by the Sarasota School. Today’s FEMA codes required a plinth to lift the house five-and-a-half feet above grade and a roof that can withstand hurricane wind loads, making it a challenge to re-create the lightness of midcentury design, Pirman says.
The house is located in the Camp Biscayne area of Coconut Grove, a neighborhood in Miami. Its main volume is clad in Prodema.
Float On

Clerestory windows from YKK Commercial give the illusion that the roof hovers above the house—a key factor in keeping the light, modern touch that the homeowners desired. Epstein did not design the clerestories in a single, straight line; the glass drops down where possible to allow the maximum amount of light. It took a bit of convincing to sway his clients. “He said, ‘Listen to me, stay with my concept, and you won’t be sorry,’” Tetreault recalls. “So I stuck with it, and I’m not sorry.”
Raise the Roof 

Using a commercial roof in a residential project was a first for architect Michael Epstein. While similar systems are often covered, Epstein chose this long-span roof deck from Epic Metals for its beam-like interior face, which hides fastenings in its deep grooves, creating a flat-panel appearance.
Clad in Western red cedar siding and punctuated with floor-to-ceiling windows, this minimalist two-bedroom home boasts sunrise views over the Sonoma hills.
The architect placed the windows at Sabrina’s eye level so that she’d be able to see her son, Rocco, playing in the yard outside. "You can feel the seasons changing here," says Chiavelli. "I grew up three miles from here, outside in nature. This is a house for experiencing life."
This detail shot shows how Burneo anchored the laminated slats for the exterior wood screen to a concrete slab.
Florida-based studio Yield displays a number of its modern home goods, including the French Press coffee makers, Spun Planter, and Meso Pendant Light.
The bath’s Kohler Purist fixtures and Frederick Weinberg animal figures sit on a Corian countertop
Pirman, an illustrator, works on a vintage Florence Knoll table in his studio at the front of the house.
Benjamin Moore’s Tomato Red provides “punctuation” to the exterior. “That was the cheapest way to have that hot spark of color,” Pirman explains.
Shady Business

“What makes this house wonderful to live in is that the light is always, always changing,” says Pirman. Here, he adjusts shades fabricated by Unique Wholesale Distributors, which pull down in the morning when the sunlight is strongest.
In the master suite, a painting by Eric Freeman hangs over a West Elm bed.
Show It Off

While the couple’s art collection is a focal point of the house, the structure’s abundance of glass walls means there are fewer places on which to hang it. Custom one-and-a-quarter-inch hardwood-plank shelves and a credenza from DWR provide places to rotate favorite pieces.