The conclusion of World War II brought a huge influx of American optimism, which led to a burgeoning middle class interested in buying and nesting. The midcentury modern era left an indelible mark on modern design. In product design, midcentury modern masters include Ray Eames, Charles Eames, Achille Castiglioni, Arne Jacobson, Isamu Noguchi, Jean Prouve, Eero Saarinen, Poul Kjaerholm, Hans Wegner, Charlotte Perriand, and Alvar Aalto. Giants of modern architecture include Mies van der Rohe, Ray and Charles Eames, Rudolph Schindler, Paul Rudolph, Charles Ellsworth, and Richard Neutra.

In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
Bertoia bar stools by Knoll are tucked under the island in the Scavolini Scenery kitchen. Jordan replaced the original wood flooring with white resin, a robust surface used in high-traffic environments.
The Citrons inherited the Modernica sofa, chaise, and table from the previous owners. They added a Jasper Morrison cork stools, all by Vitra. The cedar interior walls were inspired by the exterior cladding and are finished in orange oil beeswax by Howard.
The previous residents sheathed the exterior in cedar, which the Citrons loved and decided to keep.
Steven and Tata relax in their living room. “The house has always been deemed the ‘great escape,’” says Steven. “It’s a very special place for us.” The Superheroes stool and table are by Swedish designers Glimpt Studio for Cappellini, the blush-colored rug is from ABC Carpet & Home, and the Pan Pan rabbit figurine is by Ligne Roset.
He added floor-to-ceiling windows by Andersen, which allow low winter sunlight to warm the interior in colder months.
Steven and Tata Citron stand in the kitchen of their renovated 2,300-square-foot midcentury abode in Newburgh, a town located 60 miles north of New York City. Architect Jeff Jordan opened up the house’s interior, added extensive glazing, and recast surfaces to enhance the connection to the outdoors and create a clean, unencumbered living space.
The cooktop and oven are Miele, the counter-top is Caesarstone, and the refrigerator is Liebherr.
Jordan removed built-in shelving behind the stone fireplace and installed a Cor-Ten steel panel in its place. Vitra manufactures the Jean Prouvé–designed Standard dining table and side chairs.
In their concrete-walled courtyard, Yuka and Aaron watch as twins Emerson and Jasper, daughters Maude and Mirene, and Alfie the dog play. The house is painted in Black Bean Soup by Benjamin Moore, a color in keeping with the period of the original architecture
The kitchen was formerly closed off and now flows into the living room post renovation.
Jordan put the living room on a diet, so to speak, reducing surfaces to open the space. He removed three feet of the existing stone fireplace surround and peeled back the ceiling to reveal steel structural beams, painted a red color matched to their original hue. The house’s footprint stayed the same. “Keeping most of the existing house was the biggest ‘green’ thing we did,” says Jordan. Instead of recalibrating the plan, he focused on introducing daylight, adding insulation, and replacing windows to maximize views.
On the house’s south side, Jordan excised the covered porch.
The clerestory windows were originally screens covered by sliding plywood panels that could be opened to allow in light and air.
The once-hermitic kitchen now has a direct view of the patio and pool. The hood is by Zephyr, the cooktop is by Miele, the refrigerator is by Sub-Zero, the ovens are by GE Monogram, and the stand mixer is by KitchenAid.The Sebastian barstools and Trådig fruit bowl are also from Ikea.
Shope and his wife carefully designed an eco-friendly landscape: For instance, they did not fell any tree with holes that could support an owl’s nest. They also planted flower species that feed hummingbirds and monarch butterflies. Shope laid out the pathway of reclaimed granite slabs that leads toward the Hudson River below.
A 3,500-square-foot home in upstate New York was designed by the architecture firm Mapos with simple materials and passive design principles. The contemporary fireplace, which sits on buffed concrete flooring at the center of the ground floor, was custom-made by Mapos.
However, relying solely on concrete was not the best use of the budget, so Mulvena “balanced the concrete floors and highlights with a simple palette of affordable but industrial materials: black steel and plywood." The couch is by BoConcept.
The horizontal layout of the home allows for easy movement throughout the interior, while the line of the continuous roof seems to extend into the trees. Enlarging the opening of the home allowed for impressive views of the river and surrounding area.
A pool located just outside the dining space and master bedroom echoes the home's angular forms.