Whether it's a kitchen remodel or new construction, these images represent the most modern kitchen renovation ideas from designers, architects, builders, and design enthusiasts. Kitchens are the hardest working room in the house. The best modern kitchens have ample work space for cooking, flexible space for family meals and large dinner parties, and efficient kitchen appliances and fixtures. From ideas for kitchen backsplashes and kitchen lighting to smart kitchen storage, here you will find Dwell stories about modern kitchen renovations, tons of images of modern kitchens, as well as information from top kitchen brands selling tiles, appliances, fixtures, sinks, kitchen tools. You'll also see kitchen furniture from kitchen tables, kitchen chairs, dining sets, and bar stools.

The architects went with a bold, orange hue for the kitchen countertops. Past the front door and a short hallway lies an expansive living, dining, and kitchen space.
The cooktop, refrigerator, and wall ovens are by Jenn-Air; the sink and faucet are by Kohler; and the countertops are from Caesarstone.
Though the kitchen fits in with its period surroundings, a few tweaks keep it current. “It’s functional in a way that doesn’t feel like the kitchen is in the living room,” says architect Rick Black. He explains, “One of the goals was to make the islands more like furniture than like heavy objects that go all the way to the floor.”
Builder Jason Miars fabricated the walnut-paneled walls and kitchen cabinetry, which is accented by stainless-steel Linnea drawer pulls.
Between the kitchen and a sitting area lies a simple bar area.
The cedar siding used on the exterior reappears throughout the house. Keen on recycling the wood, the couple added shelving to their kitchen as well.
In 1962, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill architect Arthur Witthoefft won the AIA's highest honor for a home he built in the lush woods of Westchester County. Having fended off a developer's wrecking ball, Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene went above and beyond to make this manse mint again.
The horizontal layout of the home allows for easy movement throughout the interior, while the line of the continuous roof seems to extend into the trees. Enlarging the opening of the home allowed for impressive views of the river and surrounding area.
The mix of stone, masonry, and wood in the south-facing terrace replicates the style of the original house. In order to ensure the space felt warm and inviting, the architect replaced the existing steel structure with solid cedar, adding cedar posts and shutters to unite the wood ceiling with both the interior and with nature outside.
A pool located just outside the dining space and master bedroom echoes the home's angular forms.
The architects ripped out the existing kitchen, bounded by walls that distracted from the openness of the original house.
The architects felt that a strong vertical addition would draw extra attention to the original house’s strong horizontal character. The tower itself is a reinterpretation of an A-frame from another Strenger house five doors down.
For the kitchen, American cherry wood was used to create cabinets that establish a warm and sturdy tone. Each piece of lumber was purchased at auction by the Brillharts and stored in New Hampshire, before being shipped to Miami and milled on site. The wood island is painted black to provide a point of visual contrast.
The roofline, set on top of glass clerestories on a transparent central volume, begat the building’s local nickname: Butterfly House.
The kitchen is completely open to the main living area and features a custom birch pegboard wall. Eames dining chairs accent the space.
For the new kitchen, they incorporated a Smeg cooktop, oven, and range hood, stainless steel cabinets from Habitat, and personal accessories like a prototype goblet.
In the kitchen, white MDF cabinets stow tools. A Lebanese cedar island and stainless-steel countertops provide ample work space—and a place to display treasured items, such as the Buono V60 drip kettle by Hario. The island features a Franke sink with a Vola faucet. The oven is by Siemens.
The once-hermitic kitchen now has a direct view of the patio and pool. The hood is by Zephyr, the cooktop is by Miele, the refrigerator is by Sub-Zero, the ovens are by GE Monogram, and the stand mixer is by KitchenAid.The Sebastian barstools and Trådig fruit bowl are also from Ikea.
King installed dimmable fluorescent strips by Bartco in the alcoves above the cabinets for ambient lighting.
At 525 square feet, the expanded apartment is still quite petite, so integrating solutions for managing clutter was essential. By relocating the kitchen, Greenawalt freed space for storage in the bedroom.

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