Prefab homes have always been a part of the Dwell DNA. Here you will find prefab homes published in dwell magazine as well as great prefab home ideas. Prefabricated means either panelized, modular, or kit homes. Prefab architecture works for both remote sites and dense urban spaces. Modular homes are popular but can be the most expensive to customize. It is best to change as little as possible when buying prefab. Possible advantages of pre fab include lower cost, higher degree of precision, and less construction waste.

Six-inch-square blue tiles cover the walls and floor of the girls’ upstairs bathroom. The towels and rug are also by H&M Home.
An Asymmetrical Prefab Home in Sweden

It took a mere six months—three in the factory and three on-site—for this prefab to come to fruition on the shore of Sweden’s Müsko Island.
Photo by Patrick Barta
Franson Wreland also designed the court-yard and a pair of 160-square-foot outbuildings—one is used as guest quarters and the other as storage space. While residents Julia and Fatima Olivero-Reinius chat outdoors, Chippie the dog approaches an Asplund desk and a chair by LucidiPevere.
The roughly 160-square-foot modules, dubbed Mini House 2.0, were built in collaboration with Swedish manufacturer Sommarnöjen, and are delivered flat-packed.
“How would a kid draw a house?” architect Per Franson asked himself when designing the Olivero-Reinius family home in suburban Stockholm. The simple prefab structure’s unusual color comes from a traditional source: falu rödfärg, the historic mineral paint that gives the region’s famous barns their red color. Here, the addition of a tint created a hue that matched the house’s green Plannja roof panels.
Outside, Kartell Masters chairs surround a Tom Dixon Screw table.
The family selected a Leonardo table by Achille Castiglioni to serve as additional countertop space. Waddell made the cabinets with a friend.
For the Garden House in Viksberg, Sweden, Tham & Videgård Arkitekter plotted the living quarters as a steep triangle with a bright-green kitchen in one corner. The green laminate countertops by Abet Laminati contrasts the raw plywood cabinets.
This tree house in Sweden with a mirrored exterior by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter is just large enough to host two people.
Upstairs, each daughter’s bedroom was designed as a sanctuary, with cozy touches like Simon Key Bertman quilts and cushions. The bed and Pile bedside table by Jessica Signell Knutsson sit on top of a Carpet Honeycomb by designer Maria Löw.
In the master bedroom, a Hästens bed is atop a Mats Broberg & Johan Ridderstråle rug.
Zebra-print cushion covers from H&M Home and a pair of tables by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia provide a colorful counterpoint to the neutral palette of the living area’s B&B Italia sofa and Pernilla 69 armchairs by Bruno Mathsson for Dux. A Lotta Döbling painting from Domeij Gallery hangs on the wall.
In the dining area, Splügen Bräu pendant lamps for Flos hang over a Super-Elliptical table by Piet Hein and Bruno Mathsson for Fritz Hansen.
The second floor holds three bedrooms and a living area for the girls. Here, Paula, 11, and Sofia, 9, hang out near an IKEA PS 2012 sofa by Nike Karlsson. The slatted wall at left allows a view to the downstairs.
The Pryors relax at their Montauk retreat among modular furniture from Richard Schultz's Swell Seating Collection and chaise longues from his 1966 collection from Knoll.
Meili and Anais lounge on a Transform sofa by Moroso.
The other unit is a conference room with bamboo floors.
Studio owner Joey Williams uses his space to work from home as an Austin-based media director.
Landscape architects Reed Hilderbrand helped fill out the completed prefab by planting sedge grass on one of the house’s two green roofs to reflect the texture of the surrounding meadow.