When we think of modern lofts and loft living we think of live/work spaces with high ceilings, expansive windows, and an open plan. Here we show the best ideas for industrial loft spaces that have been transformed into modern residences. As more people look for reinvigorated downtown housing options, loft spaces exemplify modern urban living.

Delightfully simple, yet wonderfully functional, the rainbow-hued trivet offers an attractive way to protect tabletops from hot pots. $20 from areaware.com.
In a light-filled New York loft, a PH Artichoke hangs over the dining table. The low hanging pendant and round rug help delineate a separate dining area within the larger home.
Architecture and design firm Andersson-Wise designed a prefab steel-grid boathouse for the Martin family. After delivering the orthogonal frame by truck from Houston, the team then transported it by barge to the home's final site in Austin.
The loft is furnished with a Tillary sofa from West Elm and a wire-base Elliptical table by Charles and Ray Eames.
When not in use as the headboard, the large redwood slab folds down to become a desk.
The Tower House is made up of tiny houses, clustered at the southern end of the property and clad in white steel panels and western red cedar shingles. Spinning off the living room on the north side of the main house, the children’s study sits separate from the other pavilions. On its upper level, Oxley netting forms a web on which the kids and their friends can sit and read with views of the leafy street and garden.
“What often happens in our relationship is I come to Funn with an idea and he makes it into something livable.” —Vincent Kartheiser
A social creature who seems to know everyone, Loft J occupant Jamil Malone has hosted several "alcohol-themed" parties and manages to wedge as many as 20 people into his studio. The gatherings are like gallery openings, with the walls of Malone's apartment displaying a roving selection of locally produced art.
Recinto lava stone lines a patio adjacent to the living room in designer Ezequiel Farca’s house in Mexico City. Farca designed the teak outdoor furniture, including two armchairs.
Architect Yuri Zagorin Alazraki’s refined home in Mexico City is oriented as a series of stacked boxes.
An Eames-like house of cards could often be seen in various buildings around the little city.
Kartheiser’s private courtyard includes a covered seating area and fire pit, designed by Roberts.
Maja's room is filled with toys and includes a little desk area for drawing and writing.
“I believe that whenever you’re hiring an artist, and Funn is an artist, he’s going to do his best work if he’s trusted,” says Kartheiser.
Kartheiser's courtyard also includes a dry sauna with a ceiling made from 2,500 pieces of wood.
By burnishing historic details and adjusting the floor plan, multidisciplinary studio Loft Szczecin restored and transformed a loft in a warehouse that dates from before World War II. The living room rug is a Polish textile from the 1930s.
In the seating area, a trolley found at a flea market functions as the coffee table alongside an expansive Navone–designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table.
Uninterrupted cement flooring was chosen for the mezzanine. The cement extends to the bed and bathtub block, while the exposed ductwork and black beams above dramatically accentuate the ceilings.
Futuristic floating stairs lead to the loft’s mezzanine. Throughout the lower level, natural stone was chosen for the flooring, laid at an irregular angle to add visual interest.
Designer in Brooklyn, New York

"The pieces in the space are a combination of industrial reclaimed finds and bespoke, often both in the same item. The cabinets were a vintage medical find, powder-coated and set up on welded stilts. The mirror was commissioned from Made In Chinatown. Ceiling color and texture came through lots of trial and error in order to avoid the heavily toxic and arduous process normally involved in staining concrete. The mezzanine sign which marks the space was acquired through a long chain of inside jokes from a friend—I'm still unsure exactly of its origins, possibly the bygone New York Subway signage system."