Truth to materials is a major tenet of modern architecture. Concrete is one place we see this axiom in action. Historically concrete that was used in construction would be clad to make it appear as something other. Modern architecture uses concrete where appropriate and then exposes it. The Brutalist Movement was the height of concrete celebration.

A sturdy concrete countertop curves around the entire length of the kitchen, finished in a texture Webster describes as “bug splattered.” Despite the unappetizing name, it works well for rolling out dough. Its circular motif reappears in the custom cabinets’ finger pulls, which also help ventilate the cupboards. The fixtures are from Kubus and the appliances are from Miele.
See Carlos and Antoine's Barcelona kitchen in our special 100 Kitchens We Love issue, on newsstands April 5, 2011.
At a seaside New Zealand house, the simple kitchen has strandboard cabinetry and an MDF island that conceals a fireplace at one end. The bright green cabinetry of the island are a happy pop of color that references the native greenery outside.
Guess used inexpensive graded pine plywood so that he would get heavy grain patterns on the surfaces. One of the main goals in the kitchen was simplicity. To that end, he opted for a poured-in-place concrete island. "We didn’t know if we could afford to do that, but we found a great subcontractor [Nate Francis of Countertop Creations] here who had never really built anything like that," Guess says. "Because he was interested in giving it a shot and adding it to his portfolio, he didn’t charge an exorbitant amount of money because it was sort of an experiment for him as well." The kitchen features a GE Profile refrigerator and KitchenAid range, microwave, and dishwasher. The sink and faucet are from Kohler. The project's builder was Joe Doherty with Custom Homecrafters of Austin.
The kitchen features a concrete island topped with marble. Deja-Vu stools by Naoto Fukasawa surround the island. A print by Guy Gormley, as well as a painting bought during holiday in St. Tropez, hang on the walls.
Island Life

The appealing, handcrafted appearance of the concrete kitchen island is a happy accident, the result of the concrete not settling fully in its timber framing. When the framing was 

removed, the builder, Peter Davidson, was worried that Davor and Abbe would be disappointed with the bubbled result and offered to start the process again, but they loved its one-off feeling and persuaded him to keep it that way.
Read more about the Lender-Wilhelm Residence in our special 100 Kitchens We Love issue, on newsstands April 5, 2011.
"We really love to cook and much of our home life revolves around our kitchen. When we have friends over it’s great to buzz around here; it’s almost like a cooking show. We’re a very equal couple. We wanted the kitchen island to be a single form that we could both use. We can both cook and we can both wash the dishes. The whole thing is really easy to clean as it’s just one main surface that you can wipe down. So the preparation surfaces, the hob [cooktop], and the sink are accessible from both sides. It’s a simple, fun, form-follows-function principle: Store, wash, prepare, cook, eat."
Lambert pours wine in the kitchen, which is defined by a low concrete-block wall and serves as the home’s central core. The seating-area chairs are from Herman Miller.
Impromptu reading time in the open-plan kitchen is encouraged.
Concrete floors and an Ikea kitchen and spice rack make for an affordable, cleanly geometric aesthetic at the back of the bottom floor. The appliances are by Frigidaire, and the black countertops are sealed with Eco Tuff by Eco Procote.
The kitchen worktop is framed in iron, and functional wheeled storage fits perfectly underneath. The full-wall shelving system offers ample storage for dishware and cooking accessories.
In the kitchen, Dedo stools by Simone Simonelli for Miniforms pull underneath a poured-in-place concrete countertop.
A nine-foot-tall door covered with quarter-inch white oak slides along a ceiling rail and can be moved with just a finger to close off Don and Lisa’s kitchen or bedroom. Made of wood and metal, and welded onsite, the door moves along 400-pound-capacity rollers by McMaster-Carr. A matching sliding door opposite hides a storage area. “Because of their size, the doors had to be made inside,” says Don, who did the job himself. mcmaster.com
The kitchen door opens wide to improve connectivity to the backyard.
Poured by hand on site, nearly the entire structure of the El Quinche House—including the kitchen counters and sinks—was made of concrete sourced from a local quarry.
Christine (at left), and Amanda (at right) chat with David’s sister Aroha Yates-Smith (center) in the kitchen.
In a couple’s Mexico City apartment designed by David Levy of Flexform, a Murano chandelier hangs above a marble-topped dining table from the showroom.
The Antonio Citterio walnut-back Morgan chairs are also from Flexform.