“Design is so simple. That’s why it’s so complicated.” –Paul Rand

Tom Givone's current weekend abode, nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, is—so far—his capstone project, a synthesis of personal taste, material experimentation, and historically sensitive restoration: a living laboratory for how to bring the vernacular past into the present.
Tom Givone's current weekend abode, nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, is—so far—his capstone project, a synthesis of personal taste, material experimentation, and historically sensitive restoration: a living laboratory for how to bring the vernacular past into the present.
A tiny outbuilding offers a cozy living space inside a simple shell.
A tiny outbuilding offers a cozy living space inside a simple shell.
As the facade of a Bates Masi-designed home in Water Mill, New York, rises from eight to 14 feet high, the mahogany planks subtly widen. “It was quite a demand to make of the contractor,” architect Paul Masi says. “But the design was so much about traveling through the site and weaving [the house] together with the deck.”
As the facade of a Bates Masi-designed home in Water Mill, New York, rises from eight to 14 feet high, the mahogany planks subtly widen. “It was quite a demand to make of the contractor,” architect Paul Masi says. “But the design was so much about traveling through the site and weaving [the house] together with the deck.”
Before the awards presentation, Dwell president Michela O’Connor Abrams (sporting her Google Glass) announced the Dwell Vision Award, a collaboration between Dwell and Big Ass Fans. Photo by: Mimi Teller Rosicky.
Before the awards presentation, Dwell president Michela O’Connor Abrams (sporting her Google Glass) announced the Dwell Vision Award, a collaboration between Dwell and Big Ass Fans. Photo by: Mimi Teller Rosicky.
Tanya Wexler and Amy Zimmerman linger in the breezeway designed to draw eyes, and footsteps, from the driveway through the house to the gently sloping backyard and swimming pool beyond.
Tanya Wexler and Amy Zimmerman linger in the breezeway designed to draw eyes, and footsteps, from the driveway through the house to the gently sloping backyard and swimming pool beyond.
Our Kitchen and Bath award went to relative newcomer Franz Viegener for its innovative designs. Photo by: Alejandro Chavetta
Our Kitchen and Bath award went to relative newcomer Franz Viegener for its innovative designs. Photo by: Alejandro Chavetta
The Modern Lifestyle award winner was Miele, which this year encompassed an overall lifestyle vision at the show. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
The Modern Lifestyle award winner was Miele, which this year encompassed an overall lifestyle vision at the show. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Nourishmat by Earth Starter allows city dwellers to grow their own food in small spaces, and for that it snagged our Design Materials award. Photo by: Alejandro Chavetta
Nourishmat by Earth Starter allows city dwellers to grow their own food in small spaces, and for that it snagged our Design Materials award. Photo by: Alejandro Chavetta
Emeco’s combination of eco-friendly design philosophy and show-stopping bright white booth ensured their place as the winner of Best in Show at Dwell on Design. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Emeco’s combination of eco-friendly design philosophy and show-stopping bright white booth ensured their place as the winner of Best in Show at Dwell on Design. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Playforms by North Forty Design grabbed our New Product award for their simple, imagination-driven kids’ playhouses. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Playforms by North Forty Design grabbed our New Product award for their simple, imagination-driven kids’ playhouses. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
After transforming Dwell Outdoor into a verdant paradise, landscape architecture firm Shades of Green was awarded for Outdoor this year. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
After transforming Dwell Outdoor into a verdant paradise, landscape architecture firm Shades of Green was awarded for Outdoor this year. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Our Furniture category went to Clei for Resource Furniture, whose convertible beds especially piqued the judges’ interests. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
Our Furniture category went to Clei for Resource Furniture, whose convertible beds especially piqued the judges’ interests. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
For his oversize Manuka light, New Zealand–based designer David Trubridge captured the award for Lighting. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
For his oversize Manuka light, New Zealand–based designer David Trubridge captured the award for Lighting. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
With its multi-tiered fountain, trio of modern structures, and wall of fixtures, Brizo captivated the jury and brought home the award for best Booth. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
With its multi-tiered fountain, trio of modern structures, and wall of fixtures, Brizo captivated the jury and brought home the award for best Booth. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
The awards were a custom collaborative design by Dwell creative director Alejandro Chavetta and the San Francisco design firm Ohio. Photo by: Mimi Teller Rosicky
The awards were a custom collaborative design by Dwell creative director Alejandro Chavetta and the San Francisco design firm Ohio. Photo by: Mimi Teller Rosicky
In the Sustainability category, Lacava garnered the award, for showing that responsible design can be beautiful. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
In the Sustainability category, Lacava garnered the award, for showing that responsible design can be beautiful. Photo by Alejandro Chavetta.
“When I first thought of moving to Harlem, I looked at a map,” says Ryall. “The island’s about 210 blocks long, I’m near 110th Street—I thought, ‘It’s right in the center of Manhattan.’”
“When I first thought of moving to Harlem, I looked at a map,” says Ryall. “The island’s about 210 blocks long, I’m near 110th Street—I thought, ‘It’s right in the center of Manhattan.’”
In the kitchen, the cabinetry is walnut veneer with a weathered finish applied by cabinetmaker David Rogers. “The process involved sanding and rubbing in stain as well as adding a clear finish,” project architect Eero Puurunen says.
In the kitchen, the cabinetry is walnut veneer with a weathered finish applied by cabinetmaker David Rogers. “The process involved sanding and rubbing in stain as well as adding a clear finish,” project architect Eero Puurunen says.
A 17-foot-tall freestanding play structure that designer Sharon Davis designed for her family in upstate New York can only be entered by climbing taut netting and entering through a trap door. Descending requires sliding down two structural-columns-turned-fire-poles.
A 17-foot-tall freestanding play structure that designer Sharon Davis designed for her family in upstate New York can only be entered by climbing taut netting and entering through a trap door. Descending requires sliding down two structural-columns-turned-fire-poles.
One-Family Custom Housing: Olson Kundig Architects created this home in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
One-Family Custom Housing: Olson Kundig Architects created this home in Washington's remote Methow Valley as four structures oriented around a central courtyard, each positioned to best enjoy the surrounding vistas in all four seasons.
The wood-frame residence and studio are clad in vertical cedar siding—back then, a daring competitor to clapboard—instead of concrete to save costs. The effect is equally seamless, however: “If you drive by it fast enough,” Charles Gwathmey once said, “you still might mistake it for a concrete house.” Photo by Norman McGrath.
The wood-frame residence and studio are clad in vertical cedar siding—back then, a daring competitor to clapboard—instead of concrete to save costs. The effect is equally seamless, however: “If you drive by it fast enough,” Charles Gwathmey once said, “you still might mistake it for a concrete house.” Photo by Norman McGrath.
“Who better than the farmer and the farmer's family to know how most effectively and easily to find efficiency?” says architect Alan Barlis. Regional architecture inspired the barn-life structure of the house, an open volume that aides in efficient heating and cooling of the space.
“Who better than the farmer and the farmer's family to know how most effectively and easily to find efficiency?” says architect Alan Barlis. Regional architecture inspired the barn-life structure of the house, an open volume that aides in efficient heating and cooling of the space.
Nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, this 200-year-old home inspired one former copywriter to delve into architecture as a living. Inside, renovator and owner Tom Givone mixes vintage and industrial decor. Photo by Mark Mahaney.
Nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, this 200-year-old home inspired one former copywriter to delve into architecture as a living. Inside, renovator and owner Tom Givone mixes vintage and industrial decor. Photo by Mark Mahaney.
The great room in the 2,800-square-foot house that architect Drew Lang designed for his family in the Hudson Woods development north of New York City features generous amounts of white oak, which he says is his favorite material.
The great room in the 2,800-square-foot house that architect Drew Lang designed for his family in the Hudson Woods development north of New York City features generous amounts of white oak, which he says is his favorite material.
The Langs use an outbuilding as a rec room of sorts. "We call that the Grace Studio," Lang says. "It's designed so a car can pull in there, but we use it as more of a rec room and work space."
The Langs use an outbuilding as a rec room of sorts. "We call that the Grace Studio," Lang says. "It's designed so a car can pull in there, but we use it as more of a rec room and work space."
A yellow Pedestal filing cabinet by USM is tucked under a built-in desk in the guest bedroom. The leather-back chair was designed by Michael Robbins, a furniture designer based in New York's Hudson Valley.
A yellow Pedestal filing cabinet by USM is tucked under a built-in desk in the guest bedroom. The leather-back chair was designed by Michael Robbins, a furniture designer based in New York's Hudson Valley.
The master bathroom features a cedar screen and quartzite tiles by Walker Zanger.
The master bathroom features a cedar screen and quartzite tiles by Walker Zanger.
White oak makes a return appearance on the ceiling in the master bedroom.
White oak makes a return appearance on the ceiling in the master bedroom.
The home is embedded in a hillside with five feet of soil above it. In addition to blending the structure into the landscape, the surrounding earth provides natural insulation.
The home is embedded in a hillside with five feet of soil above it. In addition to blending the structure into the landscape, the surrounding earth provides natural insulation.
Davis worked with contractor Ted Timmer to construct the playhouse on her family’s 30-acre property.
Davis worked with contractor Ted Timmer to construct the playhouse on her family’s 30-acre property.
Sliding doors partition a cozy screening room, where the resident can enjoy films and television in the comfort of custom designed furniture.
Sliding doors partition a cozy screening room, where the resident can enjoy films and television in the comfort of custom designed furniture.
SPAN Architecture recast this two-level space in New York City—previously a photography studio—as a loft-like residence that is rich in materials. A blackened steel staircase, executed by general contractor Richard Kaleta, leads to the private quarters on the duplex's second floor. The walkway is composed of custom etched glass, stretched across an open atrium to below.
SPAN Architecture recast this two-level space in New York City—previously a photography studio—as a loft-like residence that is rich in materials. A blackened steel staircase, executed by general contractor Richard Kaleta, leads to the private quarters on the duplex's second floor. The walkway is composed of custom etched glass, stretched across an open atrium to below.
An onyx "hearth" and a French limestone banquet form the perimeter of the warm living room. The carpet is from Tai Ping.
An onyx "hearth" and a French limestone banquet form the perimeter of the warm living room. The carpet is from Tai Ping.
The polycarbonate interior is bounded by an exterior band of reclaimed white-cedar siding, open to the sky.
The polycarbonate interior is bounded by an exterior band of reclaimed white-cedar siding, open to the sky.
John Milich fabricated the slide in the freestanding treehouse.
John Milich fabricated the slide in the freestanding treehouse.
The landscaping appears to be based on the mullet principle: business in the front, as seen here (manicured grid lawn, with native vegetation sprouting in careful symmetry), party in the back (sunflowers and wild mountain grass growing in harmonious chaos).
The landscaping appears to be based on the mullet principle: business in the front, as seen here (manicured grid lawn, with native vegetation sprouting in careful symmetry), party in the back (sunflowers and wild mountain grass growing in harmonious chaos).

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