134 Outdoor Gardens Design Photos And Ideas

The windows are by Jeld-Wen, and the metal roof is by Galvalume. “I feel lucky to contribute to the architectural diversity in the neighborhood with something truly of this moment that got built despite the odds,” says Marsha.
The designers used wood sparingly for maximum effect, like the cedar siding on the front and back exteriors. The main facade offers  a glimpse through the house to the backyard, which was made larger by placing the garage closer to the street. “We hosted a concert and had people sitting inside and in front of the pool,” says Jaclyn. “The house completely lends itself to entertaining small and large groups alike.”
Lofted amid eucalyptus and oak trees, Graham Paarman’s house is a glassed-in, steel-frame structure with a veil of vertical slats. Excluding outdoor areas, it measures about 720 square feet.
Board-formed concrete retaining walls double as ramps from the deck to the garden’s highest point.
Cor-ten steel planter
Front court walkway
Swimming pool at rear yard
backyard patio
A strolling garden and a pond with a waterfall have already been brought back
Uncovered paths lead straight down into the forest.
Entry with cactus garden
The house's green roof is more of a brown roof: a desert-like array of native and non-native succulents that require minimal irrigation. The soil area is maintained with motorcycle tires (including one from a Harley hog), which control erosion. Composting takes place here as well.
Roof extension with garden
View of bedroom
The yard is at the lowest elevation on the property, and was carved out to have a place for the family to play and relax. The turf is by Heavenly Greens. The space features clear heart cedar boards with a reactive stain by Weatherwood Stains.  The 30 foot green wall in implemented in segments and features built in drip irrigation. The mirrored solar reflector, which appears to have just dropped out of planetary orbit,  grabs southern light and reflects it into the home and exterior spaces.
The Hupert-Kinmont house lies low in a century-old apple orchard, far from neighboring houses. The spaciousness of the rural surroundings is echoed inside.
The long gangplank of a deck runs right out into the fields, a fact that Treanor relishes.
Maggie Treanor waters plants around her rural home.
In the rear of the house, a new addition extends the living space and adds a roof terrace off the second-floor master bedroom. A garden is accessible through a wall of sliding glass doors with Sapele mahogany frames, set back to control solar gain.
Maggie Treanor waters plants around her rural home.
Cor-Ten steel planters host a bounty of fresh herbs, fruits, and vegetables.
Despite being located in the middle of the city, the couple’s property is flanked by two private gardens and is in close proximity to the Washington Park Arboretum. Ian and Deb often cook using fresh vegetables from the garden, which is equipped with a PVC irrigation system.
Architects Simone Carneiro and Alexandre Skaff transformed a cramped São Paulo apartment into a mid-city refuge for Simone Santos.
Back Yard and Shed
Scattershot openings in the single-story home omit a soft glow at dusk.
The material was gathered from soil with high sand content on the property as well as a second site in the vicinity. Certain volumes of the home consist of a concrete structure and brick masonry.
Front patio with a view of the kitchen
“In the beginning I really wanted the container to be off the grid but solar is still very expensive in San Antonio, especially for small spaces,” says Hill. “The green roof was an element that I had not thought of at the beginning, but as it turns out saves me more money on air-conditioning than the solar would have, and is a lot prettier.”
“Stacey hopes that we can use this as a prototype for a development of artists’ studios someday—we talked about maybe siting several of them together, like an old mobile home park.” The steel sculpture is by San Antonio artist George Shroeder.
Garden
It feeds their backyard garden, which also features permeable paving rocks, a composting  bin, and a surrounding fence made  of knotty Western red cedar.
Working with a limited budget, First Lamp designed and built one principle architectural flourish: exposed Douglas fir rafters that would weather to a brighter red over the years and accent the white siding.
The studio occupies the corner of a backyard filled with carefully-tended plants. They positioned the studio at the yard’s far corner, diagonal from the main house’s back door, to create a path through the garden that would engage visitors in landscape.
Designed by Boston-based architect Sebastian Mariscal, this house, which celebrates the best of Californian indoor-outdoor living, was designed to frame views of the trees and the surrounding landscape.
It is all about contemplating the nature

The main living space and the entry-level interior of the house offer a view of the horizon, sea and local topography. The house features an impossible light steel frame and concrete footings to support the cedar box that contains the living space. From the living room, the owners can capture a 180 degrees view, due to the panoramic windows. The bedroom offers an axial and longer view across the cliff that parallels with the coast.
the architectural language of the building is articulated within the relationship among the small open courtyards
The intricate retail space is adorned with relics like this ornate door. Corrugated steel panels clad the building's exterior.
In addition to the retention of the building's envelope, many original elements were reworked and reused throughout the renovation.
Private garden with deck
The roof became the perfect location for their vegetable garden, as well as benches and a recreation space crowned by a hot tub powered by a four-kilowatt solar array.

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

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