76 Outdoor Large Pools, Tubs, Showers Swimming Pools, Tubs, Showers Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

Rear facade, with maximum glazing and balconies to maximize daylight, views and social interaction.
Cassidy used the pool as an anchor for an overarching backyard master plan that pulled the parts together.
Before the addition of the approximately 750-square-foot pool (and its 65-square-foot hot tub), the lot was a scramble of structures: the house in one corner and the guesthouse and the office each occupying another.
The resulting effect is a backyard with a pool at the center that is as nice to look at as to be in.
The deck off of the house acts like a dock sticking into a lake. Cassidy opted for a midnight-black earthquake-friendly epoxy lining. "It adds that little extra heat and emphasizes the lagoon feeling," he says.
“Tel Aviv is different from the rest of Israel. This is one of the most modern cities in the world.” —Architect Pitsou Kedem
“Having a family house, with everyone together, was always Lena’s goal,” says Broden.
Architect Sean Lockyer designed a 5,760-square-foot concrete, stucco, and ipe home for a couple and their three children in the Southern California desert town of Indian Wells. The residents selected the home's furnishings, including the Royal Botania chaise lounges.
The house is oriented toward the expansive backyard, where the family spends 80 percent of its time. Alfredo’s wife Lorena, son Lorenzo, nieces Camila and Valentina, and Castillo’s daughter, Regina, hang out by the pool—the focal point of Transepto’s restrained landscape design.
On an idyllic afternoon, members of the Oropeza and Castillo clans splash in the backyard pool framed by Trex decking and outfitted with furniture by Móbica.
A swimming pool was on everyone’s wish list. Gray Organschi installed it on the east side of the house, along with an outdoor fireplace. The outside pathways and decks are paved in ipe and bluestone.
Landscape designer Vickie Cardaro used native grasses and plantings near the swimming pool (opposite). Cushions upholstered in Sunbrella fabric rest atop a Trex deck. The western red cedar ceiling extends through the deep eaves and covered seating area.
The gabled house, constructed from precast concrete panels by Superior Walls with wood framing, offers a pared-down suggestion of a traditional New England silhouette. The exterior cedar paneling also appears on the ceiling of the custom-built chef’s kitchen inside.
“Concealing a stair leading to trail access to the park, the wall’s form suggests the folds and striations of the sandstone geology,” explains SurfaceDesign. While the wall and fence provide more privacy for the backyard, their transparency restores visual connections with the park.
The second floor cantilevers over the living areas, which are also layered together on the interior.
The deck connects to the open kitchen and living room through Loewen sliding glass doors. Photo by Patrick Bernard.
Once in the pool, however, it feels more like the ocean. As with a shelf, the bottom drops quickly from three feet to the nine-foot deep end. A set of three long, shallow steps sits above the middle depth like a sandbar at high tide, the top tread covered with just a few inches of water.
The final, layered look of the pool and its surroundings—which mitigates a 30-inch drop from house to guesthouse—was completed in 2008.
The pool feels as laterally finite as the house feels spacious—but the view goes up forever.
Dining with a Scandinavian touch: Archi dining chair combined with Carver table.
Gregory and Caryn Katz are dwarfed beneath the cantilevered concrete overhang, which houses the bedroom on the upper level. The stackable glass doors that run beneath allow the house to open completely to the yard and swimming pool, soften the severity of the concrete, and blur the boundary between indoors and out.
Competitive swimmer Sydne Didier commissioned Austin Design Inc. to create a 102-foot-long pool house in a freestanding structure behind her Amherst, Massachusetts, house.
In the backyard, Lena combined a hammock from a former home with Maya chaises from Room & Board. A Woolly Pockets green wall system holds a variety of succulents. “They’re beautiful and architectural,” Lena says of the plants. “And I can’t kill them, which makes me so happy.”
Twenty-foot-wide doors from Solar Innovations offer easy access to the deck. “Solar Innovations was the only manufacturer at that time that had a pocket multi-slider with a good ADA threshold,” says architect Erick Mikiten. “They almost look like steel, but are thermally broken aluminum.”
The 82-foot-long pool gets quite a lot of use by Jeff and Millie, and especially by the kids, who are both on the local swim team.
From the 1940s through the late 1960s, Arts & Architecture was  the unofficial headquarters of California’s nascent modernist movement. It spearheaded the Case Study House Program, which  produced some of America’s  greatest residences. VKG furniture was used for many of the houses, and appears in photos shot by Julius Shulman, as seen above.
The modern house responds to the local landscape in an exciting new way.
Wooden deck of the House at Los Cisnes at dawn. Concrete, Glass, Wood.
Sliding walls of glass by Arcadia are situated throughout.
A tight pattern of slate cladding complements a wild carpet of native grasses outside an East Hampton residence by Paul Masi of Bates Masi + Architects. The home, sited to capture the breeze, was constructed for a family of wind-sports enthusiasts.
To revive the original architects’ vision, studioWTA restored a four-foot roof overhang above a wall of La Cantina sliders. The shade helps limit solar gain, while a pool by Evans + Lighter Landscape Architecture provides respite on sweltering summer days.
Seen from the guesthouse, the new home touches every corner of the property without overwhelming its natural beauty.
The Babat residence in Nashville is blessed with a big backyard; however, the blistering Tennessee sun once made it feel more like a broiler than a place to kick back and relax. Enter architect Michael Goorevich—then on staff at Manuel Zeitlin Architects—who devised a wood-and-steel trellis to cover part of the space.
Baldridge wanted the porch to feel like another room. “When you try to make screened porches look like they’re outside, [I think] they look terrible, so we chose to make it actually be a part of the house,” he says.
A double-sided fireplace serves as a way to unite the screened-in porch to the house’s main, open-plan living area.
Architect Burton Baldridge’s design for a house in Austin features a cantilevered upper volume with a gabled profile that was in part inspired by the work of Dutch architects MVRDV. It juts out over the patio, outfitted with chaise longues by Harbour Outdoor and Adirondack chairs by Loll.
The old barn's foundation, re-stacked by a local stonemason, was reused as a rustic retaining wall for the pool area. The property also came with a corn crib and blacksmith shop as old as the barn, seen behind the pool, which are both used for storage now. St. Tropez chaises from Kingsley-Bate line the pool.
Perfect dinner at the Split table with stackable chair Curve.

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