349 Outdoor Wood Patio, Porch, Deck Design Photos And Ideas

Whether it's a backyard patio, an infinity pool, or a rooftop terrace, these modern outdoor spaces add to the richness of daily life. Escape into nature, or get lost in city views. Wherever you are, let these outdoor photos take you somewhere new with inspirational ideas for yards, gardens, outdoor tubs and showers, patios, porches, and decks.

The family shares an alfresco lunch with Ikimau Ikimau, a friendly neighbor who helped build the house. The aluminum weatherboard cladding was custom-designed by O’Sullivan.
Outside on the deck, one-year-old Mary and three-year-old Finbar enjoy a snack at the kid-size table and chairs Michael designed and made for them.
Another view of the deck.
A mix of vintage finds and pieces designed by Mathesius, including a Cor-Ten steel fire pit on the second-floor deck, furnish a majority of the home.
To create the feel of a seaside retreat, Mitsuori Architects included Australian Ironbark wood slats on the rear-facing wall of this rorenovated this Victoiran heritage home in Melbourne. Ironbark is an incredibly durable hardwood that turns a beautiful silvery-gray as it weathers over time.
A home near Rye, England, opens onto a deck through a Sunflex door. The living room features a sofa by  Terence Woodgate, 620 chairs by Dieter Rams for Vitsœ, and an Oluce Atollo 239 lamp by Vico Magistretti.
Using lightweight steel skeleton construction, Vienna architect Delugan Meissl boldly inserted this dazzling, modern Vienna penthouse in between traditional rooftops of the city’s Wieden district, on top of an old building.
Iceland prefab pioneers Tryggvi Thorsteinsson and Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir of Minarc built this Culver City family home with mnmMOD  – a customizable, locally manufactured building system of prefabricated panels the duo designed, which minimizes energy consumption and reduces a home’s carbon footprint. Made with a blend of 30 percent recycled steel and cradle-to-cradle certified extruded polystyrene, mnmMOD components can be assembled with just a screw gun.
A proposed wall of sliding glass doors morphed into a NanaWall system after the residents were assured the latter was more likely to be approved by the town. When folded back, the panels provide a seamless connection to the deck.
View looking over hills from deck.
View of Deck.
Bill Thompson sits on his deck.
The custom built spa was a must have for the homeowners, and features a concealed solar cover beneath the deck boards. It was raised to offer the dramatic view of downtown San Francisco and the East Bay Hills beyond. The interior of the spa is integral color plaster with a Quartzite slab liner at the water line. The sunken conversation pit lies next to the spa and features radiant tubes imbedded in its cantilevered concrete seat.
An outdoor shower is concealed in the side yard and features a weathered 
cedar slat enclosure.
The couple do their outdoor lolling on Willy Guhl's concrete Loop chair (near grating) and Superieur's Divan lounge (near the table), both Swiss products.
The office looks out on the spacious deck.
The kitchen looks out onto a broad patio and backyard through floor-to-ceiling glass, while the upstairs balcony provides shading to allow in only diffuse daylight.
A custom table surrounded by NET’s Museo chairs and poplar stools provides a space for the Sarmiento Tovo boys, Manuel, 5, and Julián, 3, to play with the toys their mother makes.
From the deck you really get a sense of the two main volumes of the house. One faces inward and the other out, a fine representation of Boone's ideas about the division between work space and living space.
Because the Collette residence, although by no means small by Dutch standards, is a compact 2,050 square feet, the inside/outside relationship is important. Glass walls front and back bring the outdoors in. Two-year-old Jort takes full advantage of the great outdoors.
The patio at the front of the house offers a view of the balcony that connects the second-floor bedrooms.
The literal and figurative centerpiece of the house is the atrium, through which light filters into the rest of the house year-round.
The dining table, a custom design by Formwork, and red Non chairs by Komplot complement the addition’s cypress cladding.
To combat the site’s steep, uneven grade, Boeschenstein staggered a series of ipe decks around the two main volumes of the house. Atticus joins his brother, Bodhi, on the zigzag decks.
When building such a modest structure in a large landscape, designer and client often had to defend their vision to their collaborators. “We knew this house was going to be for Maggie and she would live there alone,” designer Lauren Moffitt says. “But people are always projecting for future resale. Putting in the smallest size of anything—to any subcontractor, it’s just not reasonable.”
Doors and triple-glazed casement windows from Loewen work hard to form a tight thermal envelope.
Cassidy used the pool as an anchor for an overarching backyard master plan that pulled the parts together.
Before the addition of the approximately 750-square-foot pool (and its 65-square-foot hot tub), the lot was a scramble of structures: the house in one corner and the guesthouse and the office each occupying another.
The deck off of the house acts like a dock sticking into a lake. Cassidy opted for a midnight-black earthquake-friendly epoxy lining. "It adds that little extra heat and emphasizes the lagoon feeling," he says.
The decking on the rooftop is Burmese teak and the colorful Picot pouffes are by Paola Lenti.
“Tel Aviv is different from the rest of Israel. This is one of the most modern cities in the world.” —Architect Pitsou Kedem
A pair of deck chairs from the Conran Shop brighten up a deck designed and built by Mark Congdon Landscape. Visible through the window are a Praying Mantis floor lamp from White Furniture and a fiberglass rocking chair from Modernica.
A covered porch on the south side provides comfortably shaded outdoor space, and its roof keeps the high-angle summer sun out of the house.
The dramatic rear elevation showcases the open-plan living and dining room. Apart from the addition, the rest of the home maintained its “traditional” layout, with bedrooms branching off from a central hallway. Windows on all sides of the addition bring light in and make the space feel bright and expansive. Tonal and textural contrast can be seen between the burnt ash cladding at the exterior and the engineered European oak flooring at the interior. Through thoughtful design and space planning, the architects and owners made the biggest impact possible with only 500 square feet of added living space.
On the lower roof, cedar decking and flower beds define one of several outdoor gardening spaces. Part of her ongoing research into the livability of cities, Fitzgerald aimed to create landscaped areas that were “aesthetic, aromatic, educational, and productive.” The deck is bordered by an expanded aluminum mesh railing and black metal corrugated panels.
What else is the porch good for? Tricycle races, of course.
The vacation complex is designed to promote an easy flow between the two families' spaces, which include guest cabins and a shared porch for hanging out and eating.
For Karina Inzunza, Graham Barker, Melana Janzen, and John McMinn (pictured left to right), a shared vacation home on Georgian Bay was the perfect opportunity to pool resources, split costs, and create an extended family unit.
Two-year-old Annika and five-year-old Soren make music on the "nap swing," a popular hangout spot for kids and adults alike.

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